Cartoonist – Robert De Jesus http://robertdejesus.com/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 15:04:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://robertdejesus.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png Cartoonist – Robert De Jesus http://robertdejesus.com/ 32 32 Originally from Sonoma, the New York designer launches a graphic memory “Murder Book” https://robertdejesus.com/originally-from-sonoma-the-new-york-designer-launches-a-graphic-memory-murder-book/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 19:51:48 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/originally-from-sonoma-the-new-york-designer-launches-a-graphic-memory-murder-book/ When Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, from Sonoma, was 7, she would sit with her cousins ​​at their bake sales and try to peddle – unsuccessfully – her cartoons of dogs and horses. “I couldn’t believe that no one would buy my cartoons,” Campbell said with a laugh, recalling his first experience as a struggling artist. The […]]]>

When Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, from Sonoma, was 7, she would sit with her cousins ​​at their bake sales and try to peddle – unsuccessfully – her cartoons of dogs and horses.

“I couldn’t believe that no one would buy my cartoons,” Campbell said with a laugh, recalling his first experience as a struggling artist.

The New York cartoonist, who was obsessed with Charles Schulz’s drawing of Snoopy as a child, will celebrate the release of her first graphic memoir, “Murder Book”, on Sunday with a signing session in the Roche tasting room. Winery in downtown Sonoma.

The unconventional memoir teases the dark humor aspects of murder, our fascination with true criminal television, while also empathizing with murder victims.

“It’s walking a fine line, laughing at the murder, but it’s by no means laughing at the victims,” Campbell said. “It’s making fun of the genre. … Real crime is like horrible gossip. It’s the feeling you get when you can’t get away from a car accident. Want to see and learn more.

When asked why she was personally captivated by crime, the artist weaned herself off episodes of “Law & Order” and “Forensic Files” said, “This is what I tried to figure out. in the book. My mom and I are sitting around talking about murder 24/7, so there you go.

Detective, according to Campbell, is in his genes. Her mother, Laurie Campbell, is obsessed with crime stories, as are her grandmother, Courtney Vaughan, and great-grandmother, Annabel Sprague.

After reading studies by psychologists, Campbell concluded that there was something “inherently feminine” about this obsession with crime.

“Women are potentially more empathetic than men,” she said. “Women who watch the news think the victim could easily be them. A, they want to find the piece of the puzzle. The human brain loves puzzles. And B, they ask themselves, “What can I do to prevent this from happening to me?” “

Some scold that we consume too much crime because we are inundated with morbid details from the internet, news reports, podcasts, documentaries and police shows, Campbell said. But, she argued, “people have heard about crime stories since the dawn of time.”

But why the humorous approach?

“I wanted to write this book as a conversation,” Campbell said. “This is comedy. We joke about something uncomfortable for comic relief.

The author knows her graphic memoirs won’t appeal to everyone, but she expects them to appeal to true crime junkies who don’t apologize and find books like “The Stranger Beside Me” , both horrific and fascinating. Written by the late Ann Rule, the book details Rule’s personal relationship with infamous serial killer Ted Bundy.

“My mom has all of Ann’s rule books in the house,” Campbell said. “And ‘Law & Order’ was a pillar in our household. When I watch “Law & Order”, I feel like I am at home. It is truly morbid, but there is an eerie comfort in crawling into bed and watching a horrible, true crime.

The Charles Schulz connection

When Campbell was a child, a sketch of Snoopy by Charles Schulz hung in the hallway of his home in Sonoma, a gift from Schulz to his mother. Campbell’s grandfather, the late Daniel Vaughan, was Schulz’s golf buddy.

“I wanted to draw Snoopy like him (Charles Schulz),” Campbell said. “My mother took me to every art class she could find growing up. My mom put me in cartoon classes. I didn’t know I wanted to be a cartoonist, but if you look at it when I was 5, it was in the stars.

The precocious cartoonist jokes that her humor was sharpened by the tribe of her dead end.

“Everyone was terribly witty and weren’t afraid to make jokes,” Campbell said of his neighbors, a funny cross section of the people. They included a doctor, a firefighter, a NASA scientist, a restaurateur, a pilot and a rude nun who changed professions, finding the teaching more appropriate.

“Everyone was walking in each other’s doors,” Campbell said. “It was like I had five pairs of parents.”

The cul-de-sac and its characters became Campbell’s goal; she started to see humor everywhere.

“When you’re a kid, you think (humor is) normal. But realizing that other people didn’t have it, you realize how special it was, ”she said. “I realize now that I would like to be there half the time. I wish it could be kept in my mind forever.

The New York cartoonist

“Like a little cat, I searched the New Yorker’s office,” Campbell recalls of his first visit to history magazine which features in-depth journalism alongside social commentary cartoons.

“I was so nervous. I walked in and handed my drawings to Bob Mankoff, the cartoon editor. I was shaking in my boots. He said, ‘Don’t come back till you’ve done a thousand.’ “


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Ahead of Denver’s birthday, city’s most prolific cartoonist reflects on its evolution https://robertdejesus.com/ahead-of-denvers-birthday-citys-most-prolific-cartoonist-reflects-on-its-evolution/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 23:42:07 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/ahead-of-denvers-birthday-citys-most-prolific-cartoonist-reflects-on-its-evolution/ From the cover of Karl Christian Krumholz’s latest book, Queen’s City. Illustration by Karl Christian Krumholz Art For Denver’s 163rd birthday, we asked Karl Christian Krumholz to share artwork that best encapsulates the streets and characters of Mile High City. By Fiona Murphy November 19, 2021 On November 22, 1858, a group of brutal gold […]]]>
From the cover of Karl Christian Krumholz’s latest book, Queen’s City. Illustration by Karl Christian Krumholz

Art

For Denver’s 163rd birthday, we asked Karl Christian Krumholz to share artwork that best encapsulates the streets and characters of Mile High City.


On November 22, 1858, a group of brutal gold diggers founded the Denver City Town Company. Since then, the Mile High City has changed a lot. And for 10 years, designer and illustrator Karl Christian Krumholz captured his changing face in comics like the city of the queen, which was released in April. For Denver’s big day, we caught up with Harvey Pekar (of American splendor glory) to revisit illustrations that best capture its streets and explore the city that has become its muse.

“Illustrating was a way for me to get to know Denver because I was an outsider,” says Krumholz, who moved from Boston to Denver in 2006. In particular, the big signs, neon lights and the old-fashioned atmosphere. Western of Colfax architecture fascinated him. “I spent a lot of time in the bars on Colfax Avenue. He had his own character. I wanted to capture what it’s like to live in the city right now.

Designer Karl Christian Krumholz in his home studio in Denver.
Designer Karl Christian Krumholz in his home studio in Denver. Photo by Fiona Murphy.

In 2013, Krumholz started a comic book series titled 30 miles crazy! to document the characters wandering on Colfax Avenue, aka “the longest and meanest avenue in America”.

“It wasn’t until I started doing the 30 miles crazy!– a series of true stories from people in Denver – that I was like, ‘Oh, okay, that’s where my voice is,’ ”he says. In 2019, Birdcage Bottom Books distributed the seventh issue of the Multi-Series Comic Book Short Collection. The issue has been self-published.

In the four years leading up to the pandemic, Krumholz had illustrated Westwordthe weekly comic strip, The Denver Bootleg, on the city’s music scene. When this was suspended in March 2020, the artist traveled to Colfax, taking photos, searching for boarded up buildings and sketching, capturing Denver at that time. “So many places I saw were disappearing,” he says. “These buildings would have all this history attached to it, in some cases hundreds of years of history. The idea was to document what Denver looked like in the 21st century.

illustration by Karl Christian Krumholz
Extract from the series The lighthouse in the city. Illustration by Karl Christian Krumholz.

For more than a year, the COVID-19 pandemic has forced hundreds of businesses to close. Record unemployment and in progress, suffocating housing crisis affected Denver residents for over 18 months. Much of this landed in the pages of Krumholz. “I illustrated Shelby’s, which only a few years ago was among the America’s best bars. And now it’s a parking lot, ”he says.

Extract from
Extract Queen’s City. Illustration by Karl Christian Krumholz.

Earlier this year he published the fifth volume of The lighthouse in the city, a collection of illustrations from his diary (which he regularly posts on his Instagram, @karlchristiankrumholz). Readers get a sense of how attitudes changed during the pandemic from the people he met. “I’ve had a lot of stories about attacks,” he says. Explosions of violence in the streets, he said, were more frequent. Roaming, more pressing. And a sense of hopelessness among the people he met began to color his illustrations.

One of his most memorable comics in the ongoing series was inspired by the day he and his wife Kelly saw a brick fly through the front window of St. Paul’s Tavern on Colfax Avenue. During the summer, a man entered the bar to aggressively ask for water. After the bartender refused to respond to his hostile request, the man smashed a window with a brick. Krumholz dodged the flying object and pulled himself together when police arrived at the scene.

“The man kept saying ‘I never wanted to be homeless,’” says Krumholz. “The guy was screaming that he just wanted a little bit of human dignity. That’s the idea behind the comic. Maybe we should treat some of these cases with some kind of compassion. “

In the meantime, Krumholz plans to return to his comic book series on the music scene in Westword and will continue to humanize the city’s unique structures and the unpredictable characters that populate its streets for years to come. “If I had to send a birthday comic to Denver, it would be like a punch,” says Krumholz. “I’d like to say, ‘That’s why I love Denver, but these are some of the hardest truths about this city.’ I think we need to keep an eye on this. “

Prints of works by Krumholz by the city of the queen are at the moment available for purchase at the Colorado History Center.



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Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist asks $ 6.8 million for spectacular mountain-top estate https://robertdejesus.com/pulitzer-prize-winning-cartoonist-asks-6-8-million-for-spectacular-mountain-top-estate/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 19:59:17 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/pulitzer-prize-winning-cartoonist-asks-6-8-million-for-spectacular-mountain-top-estate/ While not all writers or artists need isolation in order to focus and / or inspiration, it seems award-winning designer and children’s book author Berkeley Breathed has benefited well from the relative isolation (well than luxurious) offered by his long-standing estate on top of a mountain on the outskirts. of Santa Barbara, California. Stable at […]]]>

While not all writers or artists need isolation in order to focus and / or inspiration, it seems award-winning designer and children’s book author Berkeley Breathed has benefited well from the relative isolation (well than luxurious) offered by his long-standing estate on top of a mountain on the outskirts. of Santa Barbara, California. Stable at the end of a narrow road which blows a breathtaking wind through the foothills, the secluded spread of Breathed is newly for sale across The Ebbin group at Compass at $ 6.875 million.

The designer and author of children’s books is best known for his flagship comic from the 1980s “Bloom CountyWhich at its peak appeared in 1,200 newspapers around the world and won Breathed a Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartoon in 1987. “Bloom County” ended in 1989 and was followed by the spinoffs “Outland” and “Opus”. Breathed effectively retired from comics in 2008, but revived “Bloom County” several years ago, and now regularly publishes comics via Facebook.

Besides the cartoon, the outdoor enthusiast has often dipped his professional toes in the waters of showbiz: three of his ten children’s books have been turned into films; he was consulted for the television show “America’s Most Wanted”; and he is listed as a character designer and screenwriter for the upcoming animated film “HitpigWhich will feature the voices of a number of stars including Rainn Wilson, Hannah Gadsby, RuPaul and Peter Dinklage.

Situated atop a secluded mountain above the Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club, the enviable and spectacularly private estate of Breathed spans 25 scenic acres with dreamy, shifting 360-degree mountain and ocean views. . The property includes deer meadows and horse trails that wind through hidden oak groves and lead to quiet valleys, thick forests and a stream that runs through the valley below the house. Just below the pool is a rustic and quaint writer’s hut.

Berkeley acquired the property in 1997 for $ 1.135 million and it didn’t take long for the existing residence to be razed to make way for a sprawling, warmly contemporary and eclectically appointed home of nearly 6,100 square feet with four bedrooms and four bathrooms. A separate and fully self-contained guesthouse adds another bedroom and bathroom.

Interior spaces are airy and voluminous with interesting custom details such as a black and white checkered marble floor in the lobby and a Balinese-style wooden ceiling in the split-level living and dining area, where a mantle carved antique wood makes a striking statement, while steel-trimmed glass doors frame a cinematic view. Wide plank French oak flooring throughout and Moroccan and Egyptian-style light fixtures add an overall bohemian feel.

Flooded with light thanks to a frameless zigzag wall of glass that passes behind a long counter, the kitchen is packed with all the stylish appliances and has any aspiring gourmet chef who would appreciate it. A cozy living room with a simple fireplace adjoins the kitchen and glass doors open onto a grassy patio where a charming swing hangs from the eaves in an optimal position to take in the stunning views.

Additional luxuries include a large stone fireplace in the professional-grade home theater and a wood-paneled desk with a built-in designer desk under a barrel-vaulted ceiling. Without a doubt, however, the highlight of the house is the master bedroom, a light area which, thanks to floor-to-ceiling windows on three walls, gives the impression of hovering magically above the landscape. When the view gets too intense or the afternoon sun is too dazzling, automated shades drop with the push of a button.

The outdoor spaces are no less breathtaking with postcard coastal views from the stone terrace and solar-heated swimming pool. (There is a set of solar panels attached to a slope under the house.) A grassy area in the back yard spans the flat roof of the guesthouse, providing optimal privacy for the owner and visitors. with a separate driveway, full kitchen and bedroom with built-in bunk beds.

This is not the first time that Breathed has tried to sell the estate, which appears isolated but is close to the villages of Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria. In 2013-14, he failed to find a buyer, first at $ 4.95 million and then at $ 4.475 million. But, given the new desire people have to get out of dodging during a pandemic, there’s probably a much better chance this time around that the supremely private location will appeal to a deep-pocketed shopper looking for money. a remote place to hide swaddled in relaxed luxury.

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Postage stamp from Canada honors cartoonist journalist Brian Gable https://robertdejesus.com/postage-stamp-from-canada-honors-cartoonist-journalist-brian-gable/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 19:44:42 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/postage-stamp-from-canada-honors-cartoonist-journalist-brian-gable/ Brian Gable has been giving us his cartoons to the press every day for over 40 years, most of which have appeared in Globe and Mail. With a bachelor’s degree in fine arts and education, he produced his first animation for a student newspaper while in college. In 1977, he began to draw comics once […]]]>

Brian Gable has been giving us his cartoons to the press every day for over 40 years, most of which have appeared in Globe and Mail. With a bachelor’s degree in fine arts and education, he produced his first animation for a student newspaper while in college. In 1977, he began to draw comics once a week for Brockville and the Times Recorder While teaching art in high school in brookville, use Ontario. In 1980, he became a designer for Regina Chief Position. He worked there for seven years then joined Globe and Mail in 1987.

In his cartoons, the artist represents ordinary people and how they view the decisions made by the great leaders of this world. He regularly uses sarcasm and irony to highlight the important issues facing our country and the world. During his career, he won the inaugural Canadian Cartoon Journalist competition seven times. In 2018, he was invested as a member of the Order Canada. His quote describes him as “a legend in the cartoonist community” and notes that his work “embodies our patriotic humor, that is, our ability to ridicule ourselves and our institutions.”

Canada Post unveils five stamps

Other stamps from this Canada Post issue pay tribute to Serge Chablo (JournalismUnveiled October 4 (Terry Mosher)Montreal Gazette, October 6), Duncan Macpherson (toronto star, October 7) and Bruce McKinnon (Herald ChronicleOctober 8). Live chat with cartoonists and Ian Macpherson, son of Duncan Macpherson, online Oct. 8 at 11 a.m.ET. Participation for webcasting.

Stamps and collectibles from the Caricaturistes de presse fair will be on sale on the website canadapost.ca And in post offices from October 8. To view photos of the stamps, learn more about the designers, or explore other products, take a look at the following:

  • Video showing the work of the designer.In line)
  • high definition images (In line)

Available at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time):

To access our video content on Twitter Media Studio, please contact our social media team at [email protected].

About the stamp issue

Canada Post’s latest stamp issue honors five of the country’s foremost editorial cartoonists, whose inspiring and distinctive work has helped shape the fabric of Canadian society for 50 years. These five award-winning illustrators, each honored with their own character, are among the best journalists and storytellers in our country. Their strong designs have been a remarkable feature of some of the most widely read and influential newspapers in the world. Canada for decades.

Armed with pencils and ink and a sharp wit, these cartoonists illustrate complex issues in one image and provide up-close commentaries on important events both nationally and internationally. Challenging the status quo and tackling controversial issues head-on, their work transcended politics and played an important role in defending Canadian democratic freedoms.

By drawing cartoons that tap into the feelings of Canadians, these talented artists have made us laugh, think and cry. They combine humor and art, educate and entertain us, fuel national dialogue and lift the veil on inequalities and injustices. Canada Post is proud to honor the important contributions of these cartoonists to local media and Canadian society.

SOURCE Canada Post

For more information: Media Relations, 613-734-8888, [email protected]

Related links

www.canadapost.ca


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Prominent Iranian cartoonist dies of COVID at 79 https://robertdejesus.com/prominent-iranian-cartoonist-dies-of-covid-at-79/ https://robertdejesus.com/prominent-iranian-cartoonist-dies-of-covid-at-79/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 17:04:15 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/prominent-iranian-cartoonist-dies-of-covid-at-79/ Tehran, Iran – Famous Iranian cartoonist Kambiz Derambakhsh, who has published and exhibited his art across the world, has died of COVID-19 at the age of 79, media reported on Sunday. Derambakhsh was born in the southern city of Shiraz and has been acclaimed both at home and abroad for his cartoons over a 60-year […]]]>

Tehran, Iran – Famous Iranian cartoonist Kambiz Derambakhsh, who has published and exhibited his art across the world, has died of COVID-19 at the age of 79, media reported on Sunday.

Derambakhsh was born in the southern city of Shiraz and has been acclaimed both at home and abroad for his cartoons over a 60-year career.

His drawings have been published by newspapers especially in the United States and Germany, and his work has been exhibited as far away as Japan.

The artist was particularly known for his character depicting an ordinary man without a face, sketched in a single stroke.

“Although Derambakhsh has passed away, his precious legacy, which included the Iranian people, will be forever remembered,” Iranian Minister of Culture Mohammad Mehdi Esmaili said in a statement.

In 2014, he received the prestigious French Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres award in recognition of his work.

Iran has been the country in the Middle East hit hardest by the coronavirus pandemic.

What does “fierce” mean in Hebrew?

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Syrian-Palestinian cartoonist partners with UNHCR for NFT charity sale for Afghanistan https://robertdejesus.com/syrian-palestinian-cartoonist-partners-with-unhcr-for-nft-charity-sale-for-afghanistan/ https://robertdejesus.com/syrian-palestinian-cartoonist-partners-with-unhcr-for-nft-charity-sale-for-afghanistan/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 13:09:34 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/syrian-palestinian-cartoonist-partners-with-unhcr-for-nft-charity-sale-for-afghanistan/ Dubai Design Week Grad Show Showcases Projects That Transform Lives and the Planet DUBAI: Dubai Design Week (DDW) kicked off its seventh edition on November 8 with a busy schedule for art and design lovers. One of DDW’s key exhibits is the MENA Grad Show, which showcases innovative projects in technology, science and design from […]]]>

Dubai Design Week Grad Show Showcases Projects That Transform Lives and the Planet

DUBAI: Dubai Design Week (DDW) kicked off its seventh edition on November 8 with a busy schedule for art and design lovers.

One of DDW’s key exhibits is the MENA Grad Show, which showcases innovative projects in technology, science and design from universities in the region, with a handful of projects from beyond.

The show highlights projects focused on improving and transforming lives and the planet, while the larger Global Grad Show highlights projects beyond the region in a virtual exhibit.

MENA Grad Show presents innovative projects in the fields of technology, science and design from universities in the region. (Arab News)

The physical exhibition, which runs until November 13, will allow visitors to meet the graduates, learn about the ideas behind their work and understand how students from different disciplines, from architecture to chemistry and in electrical engineering, address complex social and environmental issues.

In an interview with Tadeau Caravieri – the director of the Global Grad Show, which is an initiative of the Art Dubai group – he said that this exhibition has three main advantages for students: “Promotion”, “understanding the possibilities” and “professional development. . “

“Since 2015, we have been presenting these ideas on an international stage, giving visibility to people and researchers who are developing solutions that would otherwise not be seen outside of the university campus,” said Caravieri.

The physical exhibition runs until November 13 (Arab News)

When it comes to “understanding the possibilities,” he explained that “for the students who make it to the final selection, understanding what the other 150 people are doing and looking for is quite empowering as they can see the different angles that people use to tackle the same type of problem.

He added: “Since 2019, we have our own entrepreneurship program which helps students advance their innovations to follow a structured process to go to market.”

Caravieri said it was a banner year in terms of nominations and diversity, with organizers receiving more than 2,600 nominations from more than 70 countries, representing more than 460 universities. For the online exhibition, they selected 150 ideas from 211 students representing 52 countries.

The show highlights projects focused on improving and transforming lives and the planet. (Arab News)

The MENA Grad Show received 300 applications from 41 universities in the Middle East and North Africa region, and 60 of them are featured at the Dubai Design District physical exhibition.

Caravieri said some of the highlights of the Global Grad Show include innovation by students from Zhejiang University in China. It is a ball that can detect signs of life in areas affected by natural disasters.

From the MENA Grad Show, he said that an interesting idea was created by students at the American University in Cairo. It is an app that organizes the routine of dementia patients and supports therapy.


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Don’t laugh anymore? Australians reassess beloved cartoonist. https://robertdejesus.com/dont-laugh-anymore-australians-reassess-beloved-cartoonist/ https://robertdejesus.com/dont-laugh-anymore-australians-reassess-beloved-cartoonist/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 06:24:52 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/dont-laugh-anymore-australians-reassess-beloved-cartoonist/ The letter from Australia is a weekly newsletter from our Australia office. Register now to receive it by email. Among my family’s most precious possessions is a small framed drawing of two fairies holding hands, flying in the night sky. This is an original by Australian designer Michael Leunig. He gave it to my mother […]]]>

The letter from Australia is a weekly newsletter from our Australia office. Register now to receive it by email.

Among my family’s most precious possessions is a small framed drawing of two fairies holding hands, flying in the night sky. This is an original by Australian designer Michael Leunig. He gave it to my mother after he accompanied it with an article she wrote in The Age newspaper in the early 1980s, about my claim at the age of 5 that I was the fairy queen. Until recently, it was a simple treasure: a drawing of my mother and I imagined by one of Australia’s most beloved artists. My feelings about this have become a little more complicated lately.

It is difficult to explain to a non-Australian how the work of a cartoonist could so deeply infiltrate our national identity. Leunig’s drawings have appeared regularly in The Age for decades, but his influence extends far beyond these pages. He has published dozens of books, collaborated with chamber orchestras and some of Australia’s best-known singer-songwriters. His work has also been exhibited in Melbourne’s trams and has been turned into theatrical productions and clay figures for children’s television. In 1999 it was declared Australian Living Treasure speak Australian National Trust.

Leunig’s cartoons are generally imbued with whimsy and often depict wide-eyed characters who are overwhelmed or overpowered by the modern world. They have at times been controversial, especially her work on motherhood, childcare, and sometimes women in general. But in recent months, his art has increasingly focused on what he perceives to be injustices related to Covid lockdowns in Australia and vaccination warrants. A few weeks ago, he submitted a cartoon to The Age which places the famous image of a man standing in front of a tank near Tiananmen Square next to a drawing of a man standing in front of a tank with a syringe. vaccine replacing the turret gun. The drawing was rejected by the paper, Leunig posted it on their own social media accounts, and after a great public outcry, it was fired from his Monday editorial page. (It retains its Saturday slot in Spectrum, a section that’s more focused on lifestyle than the Monday editorial page.)

When I lived as an Australian expat in America, I often advised my friends and partners to read Leunig’s books, in order to understand the soul of Australia. This was especially true for his little books of prayers, which are non-denominational and barely religious, but which vibrate with humanity, love and sometimes anger. Her work has always told me of a certain Australian innocence, as well as a broad sense of humor that doesn’t shy away from death and sex but rarely uses these topics for free. If I were to identify the origins of my own dark sense of humor, an influence would be an old Cartoon by Leunig entitled “the horrible aspects of spring”, in which the new dog digs up the old dog at a barbecue in the backyard.

There have been a lot of comments about the recent Leunig turn, but the best I’ve read is a essay by University of Tasmania lecturer Robbie Moore on Meanjin website, a Melbourne-based literary magazine. It’s worth reading, if only to understand the depth of thought and angst that Australians pour into the turn of Leunig’s work.

It is always risky to tie an identity to the work of an artist, let alone the identity of an entire nation. And thinking back to Leunig’s work in the context of his current controversy, I feel somewhat baffled by how easily I could come across the idea of ​​Leunig’s most famous character, Mr. Curly, like the ordinary Australian man: the sweet, simple guy who just wants to hang out with his duck. This image does not speak of the real strengths of this country, which include diversity and unity. But I also understand why so many people are feeling a loss right now, a sense of betrayal that this artist who represented the possible goodness in our individual and collective Australian souls is now a spokesperson for angry conspiratorial individualists. who could be compared to victims of a massacre simply because they were asked to do a small thing to protect the vulnerable in their own communities.

We have lost so much to this pandemic in Australia: years, landmark celebrations and, most tragically, thousands of lives. I’ll probably never let go of my love for much of Leunig’s work – it’s too ingrained in who I am, in the history of my family and our collective identity. But I feel like I lost something important because of his current job and position, and I expect many other Australians to do the same.

Now for this week’s stories:




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Meet the people behind Elle India and an angry cartoonist https://robertdejesus.com/meet-the-people-behind-elle-india-and-an-angry-cartoonist/ https://robertdejesus.com/meet-the-people-behind-elle-india-and-an-angry-cartoonist/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 14:19:23 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/meet-the-people-behind-elle-india-and-an-angry-cartoonist/ On October 31, Elle India published an article targeting Hindus for speaking out against brands that target Hindu culture and festivals. Hindu outrage angered the magazine and the author who wrote the article as they tried to portray Hindus as bad guys for not letting the brands “creatively run wild”. The question here is whether […]]]>

On October 31, Elle India published an article targeting Hindus for speaking out against brands that target Hindu culture and festivals. Hindu outrage angered the magazine and the author who wrote the article as they tried to portray Hindus as bad guys for not letting the brands “creatively run wild”.

The question here is whether outrage can irritate someone so much that they decide to paint Hindus as bad guys? There must be something deeply ingrained in the intellectual sense among the people behind Elle India and this particular relationship that has caused the unrest.

OpIndia decided to dig the profiles of a few people related to the article, Elle and the illustration they used. First of all, let’s talk about Ruman Baig, the author of the so-called satirical article titled “Politics Of Shades & Silhouettes – India’s Latest Fashion Trend”. Baig has a very limited presence on Twitter, but it’s more than enough to reveal his thought process. While doing our own research, we noticed that Vijay Patel, an investigative journalist, also dug a bit of history on her.

Ruman, who has now locked her profile, doesn’t tweet a lot, but loves to retweet “prominent” intellectuals and journalists on Twitter. One of the notable names among these was Afreen Fatima. In the tweet Baig retweeted in August, Fatima spoke in favor of Sharjeel Imam, the same person who spoke about cutting Assam off from the rest of India during anti-CAA protests. This is the same Afreen Fatima who spat venom against Hindus and the verdict of Ram Mandir in the past.

Messages retweeted by Ruman Baig. Source: Twitter.

Another interesting person she retweeted was Puneet Sharma, who criticized Hindus for targeting Muslims in India. In the tweet, he wrote that Muslims and Muslim things are like drugs for Hindus. If for some reason everything related to Muslims were to disappear from India, Hindus would have withdrawal symptoms.

The tweets she liked give better insight into her ideology.

Examples of posts liked by Ruman. Source: Twitter

Now we come to Elle’s digital editor, Ainee Nizami Ahmadi. She has also locked her profile since outrage at Elle’s article. Digital publishers are responsible for content delivered on any brand’s digital platform, in this case Elle. Again, she has a limited presence on Twitter. However, in December 2020, she retweeted a post from Aysha Renna where Renna, along with other women, was standing in a vehicle during anti-CAA protests and throwing anti-India slogans.

Messages retweeted by Ainee Nizami Ahmedi. Source: Twitter

Under Ahmadi, the illustration on Elle’s Instagram account was posted in which Hindus were seen closing the shutters of FabIndia and other brands. The illustration was created by one Lord_VoldeMaut, a 19-year-old “artist” who often posts anti-Hindu content on Twitter and Instagram. Now here’s a capture. The “artist” claimed that She… wait… STOLE THE WORK! The illustration would have been posted without her permission on Elle’s Instagram account.

To give Elle a few points here, they gave credit to the artist and marked her account. But their label backfired on the poor artist when a wave of critics approached him and verified the type of content he had posted. Lord_VoldeMaut has deactivated his Twitter account and locked his Instagram account.

Furthermore, it should be noted that Lord_VoldeMaut published a whole series of contentious posts throughout the month of October under the guise of “#Inktober” which is a hashtag used by artists to post new works every day in the month. of October.

Anti-Hindu illustrations by the same artist. Source: Twitter

In an article only available in the form of screenshots on social networks, the artist had arrested Elle for having published her work without her permission. He alleged that after the outrage, Elle deleted the writer’s name from the post but kept his name intact which directed criticism to him.

An alleged post by the artist where he claimed that Elle India had used his work without permission. Source: Twitter

BTW, the artist is back with a modified grip as comrade_Kira.

The artist changed his Twitter handle to Comrade_Kira

Another person associated with Elle who raised eyebrows is publisher Arif Ayyub, brother of so-called journalist Rana Ayyub. Although he has little presence on Twitter, he often shares reports and posts about his sister on her Facebook account. While Rana is extremely vocal against the government, it appears the other Ayyub has softened his voice on social media but feels free to spread anti-Hindu material through the magazine.

Screenshot of Arif Ayyub’s FB profile. Source: Facebook
Screenshot of Arif Ayyub’s FB post where he mentions Rana Ayyub as his sister. Source: Facebook

Meanwhile, Elle India deleted the controversial cartoon from her social media account after receiving backlash about it.


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The Grimsby-born cartoonist who appeared in The Beano https://robertdejesus.com/the-grimsby-born-cartoonist-who-appeared-in-the-beano/ https://robertdejesus.com/the-grimsby-born-cartoonist-who-appeared-in-the-beano/#respond Sat, 30 Oct 2021 16:58:11 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/the-grimsby-born-cartoonist-who-appeared-in-the-beano/ A cartoonist, illustrator and author from Grimsby will feature in a collection of the best British comics. Mark Bennington, 58, has over 30 years of experience as a designer and illustrator. Also an author, Mark has had his work published in some of the biggest comics, including The Beano and The Dandy. Read more news […]]]>

A cartoonist, illustrator and author from Grimsby will feature in a collection of the best British comics.

Mark Bennington, 58, has over 30 years of experience as a designer and illustrator.

Also an author, Mark has had his work published in some of the biggest comics, including The Beano and The Dandy.

Read more news that matters to the people of Grimsby here

It should now be in a new book, The Treasury of British Comics presents: the Tom Paterson collection, which will be released in November.

Tom Paterson, a Scottish cartoonist, is one of the UK’s best-known cartoonists.

He has worked on classic comics such as Sweeny Toddler, Calamity James, Buster, Grimly Feendish, The Numskulls, Bananaman, and Dennis the Menace.



Mark Bennington, of Grimsby, is a cartoonist and illustrator with over 30 years of experience for some of the biggest publishers including Beano and Dandy. Mark offers a unique perspective on his life and career as an illustrator, author and cartoon artist.

Mark says he feels honored to be in this collection of a great comic book.

He said: “In November a book is due to be published to celebrate the work of Britain’s greatest cartoonist, Tom Paterson.

“If you read comics from the 1970s onwards, you will instantly recognize Tom’s work.

“He drew Dennis the Menace, The Bash Street Kids and Sweeny Toddler among many classics from the golden age of British comics.



The Treasury of British Comics Presents: The Tom Paterson Collection will be available at Waterstones and Amazon on November 25.

“And he drew my scripts when I joined Fleetway in the mid-1980s.

“At least 15 of my comic book scripts, illustrated by Tom, appear in this book – including my greatest creation Lucy Lastic.

“It is quite an honor to be considered worthy for publication and I have been approached for a quote for the book.”

Ideas always crop up in Mark’s head as he often scribbles them along with the possible characters.

He said, “I’m literally happier with a creative flow. You get a buzz when an idea works or a storyline comes to a successful conclusion and ties together. And you get a big bunch of pieces of paper.”



Mark is honored to be featured in the celebration of the best comics in the UK

Mark, 58, grew up in the West Marsh area and has fond memories of his time in the fishing village.

He told Grimsby Live: “I have vague memories of the old arena quarter, the open air market and the smell of Chambers coffee.

“As a kid, I was probably the happiest hanging out in the Cowboys and Indians toy department of Evington or the magazines and comics department of Albert Gaits.

“You can’t beat the smell of a newsagent and the mixture of fresh newspaper and sugary vampire tooth treats.

“There weren’t any social media or Xbox games back then, so the escape was a copy of Superman or Amazing Tales or funny ones like Sparky and Topper.

“The thrill of the free gift and I have always admired the illustration work. The excellent teachers at South Parade nurtured my natural artistic talents and I generally received requests from all the other children in the class to draw a picture. for their stories. “

Mark got A’s at O ​​’Level and A’ Level Art and thinks he should have been destined for art college until he was affected by a terrible condition.

He said: “At 16, I was cursed with the dreaded epilepsy and kind of slipped back into self-imposed exile.

“I spent a lot of time alone which I guess cultivated my imagination and I scribbled a lot and came up with character ideas.

“If you have a creative brain you need an outlet for your ideas and in my case it has turned into cartoons and comics.

“It was in the early 80’s, a lot of unemployment and I started to think that maybe a career in comics was an issue.”

Find out what’s happening in your area

Mark made his first appearance in the post with the Grimsby Target.

He said: “Locally, Tommy Target for the Grimsby Target was my first foray into cartoon illustration.

“Using them as samples, I then reached out to tabloids nationwide. The News of the World art editor was very helpful and gave me an agency manager at King Leo Studios.

“They kicked me in at Fleetway Comic Publications and then IPC Magazines.

“I have been fortunate to have been published in just about every British comic book for the past 35 years with Buster, Whizzer and Chips, Roy of the Rovers, The Beano and The Dandy.

“I drew a regular Freddy Ljungberg comic for Arsenal FC and illustrated an 8-part BBC Schools TV series Captain Crimson – currently on YouTube.

“I have illustrated several books over the years, including The British travel guide which caused a media outcry for mocking the British.

And what has Mark been up to the most recently?

He said: “With the decline of comic book publishing I have self-taught as a digital artist and these days I get online illustration work for blogs and websites.

“I currently work for an Australian football team, the Melbourne Tigers.

“And I signed a contract to publish my first children’s book Salty Jack the Fishing Smack – which will hopefully do for trawlers what Thomas the Tank Engine did for steam trains.”

The Treasury of British Comics Presents: The Tom Paterson Collection will be available at Waterstones and Amazon November 25.

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Surprising Minnesota Connection Inspires Exhibition on Famous Cartoonist Rube Goldberg https://robertdejesus.com/surprising-minnesota-connection-inspires-exhibition-on-famous-cartoonist-rube-goldberg/ https://robertdejesus.com/surprising-minnesota-connection-inspires-exhibition-on-famous-cartoonist-rube-goldberg/#respond Fri, 29 Oct 2021 16:33:05 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/surprising-minnesota-connection-inspires-exhibition-on-famous-cartoonist-rube-goldberg/ The name of professor butts, a fictitious fictitious inventor, appears on the screen of an old Blackberry. When the phone vibrates, it falls off a ledge, causing a yellow ball to flip onto a table, sending it flying down a small blue slide. After triggering several more levers and plowing a bunch of cans, water […]]]>

The name of professor butts, a fictitious fictitious inventor, appears on the screen of an old Blackberry. When the phone vibrates, it falls off a ledge, causing a yellow ball to flip onto a table, sending it flying down a small blue slide. After triggering several more levers and plowing a bunch of cans, water sprinkles a daisy that sprouts in the world.

This is the artist by Robin Schwartzman “Machine for watering a plant while you’re outside”, a bespoke Rube Goldberg-style work inspired by the designer whose name has become synonymous with wacky and overly complicated gadgets.

Rube Goldberg, the famous American Jewish cartoonist, author, engineer, and artist, is best known for his drawings of his famous “machines” that take many steps to perform ridiculously simple tasks. The Minnesota Jewish Community Center commissioned Schwartzman’s play for a two-part exhibition dedicated to the life and work of Goldberg (1883-1970) until December 20.

The show was born from an unusual connection.

“I got a call three years ago from this guy Geoffrey George,” said, “I have a bunch of my grandpa’s old work in my basement. Do you ever show it? ‘people’s art?’ “said Robyn awend, director of cultural arts of the JCC. “The intro wasn’t super exciting and I was like, ‘OK, tell me a little more.’ He said, “Have you ever heard of Rube Goldberg? And I was like, ‘Duh. Is that a joke?'”

George, who lives in St. Paul, is the youngest of Goldberg’s three grandchildren (their last name has been changed to avoid a backlash from the political views of the American Jewish cartoonist). He did not know Rube well, but when the artist died, his work was distributed to the grandchildren.

Awend quickly found herself in George’s basement alongside show producer Larry Pepper, enthusiastically sifting through archival gems.

The exhibition is divided between two places. The exhibit at the Sabes Center in St. Louis Park focuses on Goldberg’s life, career, ridiculously complex “machines” and the company he kept, like Charlie Chaplin and Groucho Marx, while the Capp Center in St. Paul’s focus is on his political cartoon work. , who won him a Pulitzer Prize in 1948.

In true Rube style, the exhibit in St. Louis Park is titled “Simplicity Made Complex” while the St. Paul exhibit is “Complexity Made Simple”.

Awend’s six-person team were organizing the ambitious exhibit when COVID hit.

To get things going, George decided to make a 40-minute documentary about his grandfather, “The Two Lives of Rube Goldberg”, which premiered this year. Twin Cities Jewish Film Festival and can be viewed free of charge online until October 31 via minnesotajcc.org.

It became a way to learn more about his grandfather.

“Growing up in my teens and twenties, I just didn’t understand what the problem was,” said George, who is 60.

Although his father, Thomas georges, entered the fine arts – a small exhibition of his abstract paintings is also currently on display at the Sabes Center – and his uncle became a theater and film producer, Geoffrey felt no pressure to be successful in the arts. But like Rube Goldberg, he still ended up becoming a filmmaker.

Goldberg machines are regularly referenced in pop culture, as in the 1985 movie “Pee Wee’s Big Adventure”, the Mouse Trap board game and “Back to the Future” movies, to name a few.

It is experiencing another revitalization among schoolchildren thanks to the Rube Goldberg Machine Contest, launched in 1988, which gives them the chance to build their own wild gear.

Geoffrey George hopes kids continue to be inspired to make their own machines – and leave their phones to explore the world.

“I’ve been to a few of these Rube Goldberg contests and I’ve been overwhelmed with the energy of these kids,” he said.

That same collaborative energy drove Schwartzman as the Minneapolis artist worked on his own Rube Goldberg machine with Awend’s children. Reese, 11, Jojo, 9, and Simon, 6, helped her paint, solve problems and run around the gallery like crazy.

“They were my great testers and reformers for what to do when things didn’t work out,” Schwartzman said. “I was really shocked and amazed that they accepted, and how smart their suggestions were.”

Rubé Goldberg

“Simplicity made complex”: 6 am-7pm Mon-Thu, 6-6 Fri, 8-6 Sat-Sun through December 20, Sabes Center, 4330 S. Cedar Lake Road, St. Louis Park. 952-381-3400.

“Complexity made simple”: 5.30am-10pm Mon-Thu, 5.30pm-6 Friday, 7-6pm Sat-Sun until December 20, Capp Center, 1375 St. Paul Av., St. Paul. 651-698-0751.

Admission: To free.

Info: minnesotajcc.org


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