Cartoonist – Robert De Jesus http://robertdejesus.com/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 22:06:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://robertdejesus.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png Cartoonist – Robert De Jesus http://robertdejesus.com/ 32 32 MAD’s oldest active idiot The Daily Cartoonist https://robertdejesus.com/mads-oldest-active-idiot-the-daily-cartoonist/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 21:05:07 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/mads-oldest-active-idiot-the-daily-cartoonist/ Home / Section: Birthdays Sergio Aragonés: MAD’s oldest active idiot … Aragonés contributed to a special edition of MAD, published on Tuesday, which marks the magazine’s 70th anniversary. The special edition also highlights Aragonés’ status as the oldest artist currently drawing for MAD. He says he was blessed to spend six successful decades with the […]]]>

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Sergio Aragonés: MAD’s oldest active idiot

… Aragonés contributed to a special edition of MAD, published on Tuesday, which marks the magazine’s 70th anniversary.

The special edition also highlights Aragonés’ status as the oldest artist currently drawing for MAD. He says he was blessed to spend six successful decades with the iconic magazine…

Once Aragonés left for New York in 1962, he didn’t know if publishers there would appreciate these wordless cartoons.

MAD editors, however, immediately appreciated Aragonés’ work. They bought his cartoons featuring astronauts and asked for an article on motorcycle cops. Aragonés then decided not to return to Mexico.

“When MAD accepted me, it was a change of life, a change of mind, a change of everything – someone liked what I did,” says Aragonés. However, despite this “radical change of mind”, he appreciated: “I didn’t have to change at all. It was what I had been doing since I was a child: drawing, drawing, drawing.

Michael Cavna, for the Washington Post, profiles Sergio Aragones
on the occasion of MAD’s 70th anniversary and Sergio’s 60th anniversary with the magazine.

 
above: MAD #76 (January 1963), Sergio's first appearance in the magazine

Sergio Aragonés had been reading MAD magazine for a long time in Mexico when he first landed in New York, bringing new artwork and hope. He walked through the doors of the humor shop 60 years ago, expecting to find the place as wittily crazy as the publication’s satirically hip pages. It was, after all, the home of the staff’s self-proclaimed “usual gang of idiots.”

Instead, the recent student was introduced to a relatively quiet office on Madison Avenue. Where was the fantasy? MAD-cap frivolity? It wasn’t a high jink club.

“I thought there would be a lot of jokes on the walls,” Aragonés said via Zoom from his home in Ojai, Calif., where he celebrated his 85th birthday last month. After being hired the day he walked in to sell his work, he suggested to editor William Gaines: “Why don’t we paint one of the doors to look like an elevator – putting fake numbers on top? – confusing visitors trying to get out. Or maybe even better: “Why not put a bomb in the roof with the sound effect ‘tick-tock-tick-tock’?”

“Bill looked at me like, ‘Sergio, this is a workers office.’ He wanted the office to be very functional.


© EC Comics                          h/t: Mike Lynch

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All the true stories The Daily Cartoonist https://robertdejesus.com/all-the-true-stories-the-daily-cartoonist/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 19:14:27 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/all-the-true-stories-the-daily-cartoonist/ Home / Section: Comics Comics and their creators: true stories IIllustrator Robb Armstrong sometimes refers to his time at Syracuse University as “The Syracuse Years”, like a flashback chapter in a comic book. On September 30, Armstrong will return to Syracuse University to receive an alumni award for his long career in comics. […]]]>

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Comics and their creators: true stories

IIllustrator Robb Armstrong sometimes refers to his time at Syracuse University as “The Syracuse Years”, like a flashback chapter in a comic book.

On September 30, Armstrong will return to Syracuse University to receive an alumni award for his long career in comics. He previously received SU’s George Arents Award for excellence in his field, as the creator of “JumpStart”, one of the most circulated comics by a black artist or any artist, which follows the joys and daily trials of an African American. family.


© Ruff Sketch, Inc.

Syracuse.com profiles designer Robb Armstrong including behind the scenes episodes:

One of the administrators at the school had a daughter in her twenties who was looking for inches of newspaper. Her name was Signe Wilkinson, and a decade later she would become the first woman to receive a Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning. She agreed to let Armstrong do her apprenticeship for her.

“I was getting a lot of pats on the head at that time, like, ‘Oh boy, you really like that cartoon stuff,'” Armstrong said. “But Signe said, ‘Yeah, we can go further. “”

She criticized his work and took him with her to knock on newsroom doors. Sometimes she sold her work, sometimes publishers showed her the door. “But she was unfazed,” Armstrong said.

“I really felt like I could do it,” he said. “She made me feel like I could do it.”

MSN also carries the story for those who don’t go past the Syracuse paywall.

More behind the scenes stuff.

 
© King Features Syndicate

One of those establishment plans that takes forever to lay out and draw. I watch comics from the 30s and 40s and the amount of work/detail put together and I just don’t know how they did it on a weekly schedule. For the whole gang, check out comicskingdom.com/sally-forth

Jim Keefe and Francesco Marciuliano are good at sharing.

You know those generic horoscope and fortune cookie bromides?

This Peanuts personality quiz has nothing to do with that.

Answer the 10 questions in this Peanuts quiz to find out which character you are most like. Whether you’re kind and loyal like Charlie Brown, imaginative and dramatic like Snoopy, or… uh, confident like Lucy, each character had something adorable about them.


© Peanuts Worldwide

As we prepare for the next wave of AI and its consequences (which have been part of human discourse ever since science fiction became a genre), artists are trying to adapt through serious experimentation and satirical commentary. . The latest graphic novel by Brian Fies, The last mechanical monster (Abrams Books), sits somewhere in between as a human tragedy of a man gone wrong with a wicked compulsion to nurture mechanical intelligence as an extension of himself and personal calculation.

Steven Heller interviews the cartoonist Brian Fies on his webcomic-turned-graphic-novel.

First of all, why, after doing your previous work, which was more emotionally heavy, did you choose this comedic and apocalyptic theme?
I really like the “apocalyptic comedy”! I kind of needed to remind myself that while comics can be as mature, serious, and adult as any literary medium — which is pretty much my wheelhouse — sometimes they should be fun. I wanted a palate cleanser that didn’t involve cancer, disaster, or compiling 2,000 pages of research. It’s also pure fiction, which I hadn’t really done before. It was a refreshing stretch for me. And funny!

  
© Brian Fies

Cartoonists! Live! In person!

   
© Cathy Guisewite

Space is limited for this year’s in-person Erma Bombeck Writers’ Workshop, scheduled for October 20-22 at the University of Dayton.

This year, one of the guest speakers is a Dayton native known for the comic book that bears her name: Cathy Guisewite.

“I grew up in the Erma Bombeck era and it seeped into my young mind,” she said. “She threw real life on the page, and I started doing it. Every problem I had, I could use and get revenge on people and work things out with my mom. It’s therapeutic to do the kind of writing that Erma did. Commenting on real life.

Interviews with Dayton.com Cathy Guisewite before its appearance.

  
© Charlie Daniel

Join the crowds from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on October 8 at River Falls Park for fun, games, a photo and a handshake with Hall of Fame cartoonist and community leader Charlie Daniel.

According to a press release, Daniel will return from Knoxville, Tennessee, and sign his well-known cartoon, Weldon Rock Star, and have his photo taken with fans young and old.

The Daily Herald celebrates the Charlie Daniel back to basics with a short profile.

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The Daily Cartoonist Weekend Update https://robertdejesus.com/the-daily-cartoonist-weekend-update/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 12:45:41 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/the-daily-cartoonist-weekend-update/ Home / Section: Editorial cartoon CSotD: weekend update Jack Ohman (Counterpoint) notes the absence of conflict of interest rules for the Congress, in the light a proposal by Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) to prevent senior officials, including Supreme Court justices, from gambling in the stock market. It sounds ridiculous and unnecessary, but the fact that it’s […]]]>

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CSotD: weekend update

Jack Ohman (Counterpoint) notes the absence of conflict of interest rules for the Congress, in the light a proposal by Zoe Lofgren (D-CA) to prevent senior officials, including Supreme Court justices, from gambling in the stock market.

It sounds ridiculous and unnecessary, but the fact that it’s necessary explains why it’s not ridiculous.

It’s not entirely accurate to describe our government as a plutocracy, but it’s certainly accurate to note that we don’t have many shoe shiners and babysitters in Congress, and the handful of people from the middle and working class stands out among the millionaires. The days when an Abe Lincoln or a Harry Truman could rise from the dust seem long gone, and even then the ‘born in a log cabin’ story may be more political hype than strict accounting analysis.

As an example, here – stripped of its paywall – is an interesting account by Philip Bump of the far more complex reality behind the banal claim that Jimmy Carter placed his peanut farm in a blind trust. It’s worth reading because even a sincerely ethical man like Carter had a hard time disentangling himself from his possessions, and he was trying.

Not everyone makes that effort, and sometimes it’s out of greed, but other times it’s trying to explain “wet” to a fish. They’ve lived in a world of stock trading for so long that they don’t recognize it, and they certainly don’t realize that not everyone lives that way.

Although Marie Antoinette didn’t say it anyway, the old “let them eat cake” was based on the blind assumption that, if people didn’t have bread, they could instead eat buns and other baked goods, because – my faith! – everyone has them.

Another metaphor is to consider how we are hurtling down narrow roads at 55 mph, protected from oncoming traffic by stripes of paint on the asphalt.

It works fine until it no longer does.

Likewise, we have, through this whole sordid coup attempt, realized how our system is based on the good faith and honest intentions of the participants, and how easily it can implode when someone decides to exploit the lack of real constraints.

The biggest laugh being that when I was hired as a reporter I was told it was fine to own stocks but I shouldn’t do a lot of trading and trading and such, which might have mattered to the Washington Post or the NY Times, but seemed a bit silly to our little newspaper, because I kinda doubt that the fact that I’m writing about the new crosswalk near the The paper mill was going to have a big impact on Georgia-Pacific’s stock prices.

But we had these rules because ethics mattered.

Past.

juxtaposition of the day

(Bill Bramhall)

(Ann Telnaes)

Even admitting the limited constraints of existing law, it is clear that outright lying and fraud are not a matter of ethics but of legality.

As Bramhall suggests, it’s taken Tish James a while to put the hook in that Pinocchio’s prone nose, and she hasn’t landed the fish yet, while Telnaes points out that her catch includes the whole family, regardless of Bill Barr’s Defense poor orphan children who had no idea what was going on.

It’s not just that people in their 40s are far too young to be held accountable for their actions. It’s obvious, and that’s precisely why there is no one under 50 in any of our prisons.

But there’s an extra defense in there, when the president-elect held a press conference to explain how he was going to hand over all Trump operations to the little Trumplingsthe files of information they were supposed to rely on seemed empty.

The poor children had no advice!

Having covered real estate development for years, my expectations of the business are modest. “The art of the deal” is well formulated: many more shopping malls are nailed to golf courses than are meticulously planned in conference rooms.

So when – after million dollars Scaife and months of high profile but vague accusations – the facts of the Whitewater deal finally emerged, it may have shocked rubies, but those of us who covered commercial real estate were astounded, because it is how it works and we could point to a thousand offers exactly like that.

Which may have confused us when Trump took the throne, because he came across as another loud-mouthed, corner-cutting, self-promoting bullshit artist. A good one, watch out. A very good one. But still familiar.

However, most snake oil sellers are careful to walk very close to the line without crossing it completely.

Every once in a while, a high-flying tyro gets its tail caught in the crack, and the industry throbs with a combination of schadenfreude and existential dread.

Because no one – crooks or journalists – really expects a Tish James to come along and press charges.

I think I’m in love.

Still on the subject of scammers, I had a good laugh by Drew Sheneman cartoon, in which he notes that DeSantis and Abbott can honestly say they sent those Venezuelans to a much better place.

One could argue, for example, that spending money on Texas’ failing power grid might be a smarter move than using it for campaign stunts, but, then, the fact that an overwhelming majority of people support a woman’s right to control her own reproductive health did not prevent them from imposing a minority view on their states.

To hell with practical considerations.

I’m more concerned about people – including some cartoonists – who continue to repeat outright absurd lies about the Martha’s Vineyard scheme. I worry for a nation in which people honestly believe in such transparent and hateful nonsense.

Besides, I’m intrigued by Floridians who are proud to have fled Castro, but who have no compassion for those fleeing the communist government of Venezuela.

Salazar also bragged on Twitter about hating Chinese Communists, only for users to ask her why, so she voted against the CHIPS Act to bring high-tech production home.

Silly question. It’s all about team loyalty.

It doesn’t matter if they win or lose, cheat or play fair, as long as they are part of our team.

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Mary Kincaid – RIP The Daily Cartoonist https://robertdejesus.com/mary-kincaid-rip-the-daily-cartoonist/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/mary-kincaid-rip-the-daily-cartoonist/ Home / Section: Comics Marie Kincaid – RIP Designer Mary Kincaid left us. Mary Elizabeth Kincaid (born Getz) June 4, 1923 – September 14, 2022 From the obituary: Mary grew up in and around Toledo OH, and when she was ten her mother died of heart disease. Luckily, she had a doting father who […]]]>

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Marie Kincaid – RIP

Designer Mary Kincaid left us.

Mary Elizabeth Kincaid (born Getz)
June 4, 1923 – September 14, 2022

From the obituary:

Mary grew up in and around Toledo OH, and when she was ten her mother died of heart disease. Luckily, she had a doting father who she was close to until his death several years later. Although he was a professional engineer on Great Lakes freighters and in steel mills and automobile factories, Mary’s father was also a gifted draftsman. He took his baby girl to Saturday art classes at the Toledo Art Museum and instilled in her a lifelong love of drawing.

Our storybook on WWJ-TV, which aired when Mary’s first two children were toddlers. Host Jane Durelle read a story while the camera focused at length on one story illustration after another, just like a storybook. Mary was one of the artists who drew these illustrations, mailing them to Detroit weekly.

In the early 1960s, she decided to create a simple French newspaper comic based on Les Misérables by Victor Hugo. His strip started in The Ann Arbor News, had great success and was later published by newspapers across the United States. She was featured in Time magazine in 1963 for this creation.

Mary then branched out into other stories, then into filmstrips and radio plays, all designed to teach foreign languages ​​to children.

Mary’s comic strip French Tales ran from 1962 to 1965.

Like Milton Caniff and Charles Schulz, Mary inspired others to create comics.


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David Boyd – RIP The Daily Cartoonist https://robertdejesus.com/david-boyd-rip-the-daily-cartoonist/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 21:04:22 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/david-boyd-rip-the-daily-cartoonist/ Home / Section: AAEC-flow David Boyd – RIP Press cartoonist and illustrator David Boyd left us. Robert David Boyd (Sr.)October 1938 – September 20, 2022 Excerpt from the Newnan (Ga.) Times-Herald obituary: Legendary political cartoonist, artist and character David Boyd Sr., 83, died Tuesday after a long illness. Boyd published his first political cartoons in […]]]>

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David Boyd – RIP

Press cartoonist and illustrator David Boyd left us.

Robert David Boyd (Sr.)
October 1938 – September 20, 2022

Excerpt from the Newnan (Ga.) Times-Herald obituary:

Legendary political cartoonist, artist and character David Boyd Sr., 83, died Tuesday after a long illness.

Boyd published his first political cartoons in 1968, in The Newnan Times-Herald. The cartoons were so popular that he ended up selling them to several other Georgian newspapers.

He later teamed up with local attorney Gus Wood to create Mark-Morgan Features, a syndicated newspaper service which, in addition to Boyd’s cartoons and comic strips, offered a political column, crossword puzzles, a horoscope and a church page. Mark-Morgan’s content has appeared in over 200 newspapers.

 

Boyd was renowned for his political cartoons – in 1982 he became the first freelance artist to win a Green Eyeshade Award for excellence in journalism – but his illustrations also appeared in books and magazines and on greeting cards.

He lent his considerable drawing skills to the books of famed comedian Lewis Grizzard and created a whole host of iconic characters for comedian Jeff Foxworthy’s “You Might Be a Redneck” books and merchandise.

But Boyd’s real passion was politics. His scathing cartoon commentary made enemies of a wide range of public figures. some of them sought him out for a confrontation and left his presence after making a new friend. Others were greatly amused by his portrayal of them.

Boyd thrived on the furor and controversy he created and the people he met as a result, according to a 2016 article in The Newnan Times-Herald written after announcing his retirement from the cartoon business.

Based on Allan Holtz Boyd Apple pie weekly panel started in 1972
and its weekly The sovereign state of affairs band started in 1976.
He apparently continued to produce both until his retirement in 2016.

Fine Art America has a gallery of Boyd illustrations.

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Bruce Cochran – RIP The Daily Cartoonist https://robertdejesus.com/bruce-cochran-rip-the-daily-cartoonist/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 19:43:54 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/bruce-cochran-rip-the-daily-cartoonist/ Home / Section: Cartoon Bruce Cochran – RIP Cartoonist and humorist Bruce Cochran left us. Edward Bruce Cochran October 9, 1935 – August 22, 2022 From the obituary: Bruce spent most of his distinguished 63-year career as a freelance professional cartoonist, illustrator, humorist and writer based in Kansas City, making his debut as a writer […]]]>

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Bruce Cochran – RIP

Cartoonist and humorist Bruce Cochran left us.

Edward Bruce Cochran
October 9, 1935 – August 22, 2022

From the obituary:

Bruce spent most of his distinguished 63-year career as a freelance professional cartoonist, illustrator, humorist and writer based in Kansas City, making his debut as a writer and illustrator for Hallmark Cards, Inc. in 1960.

He went on to become a pioneer of outdoor sports humor. With a fine appreciation of the absurd, his brilliantly funny cartoons reminded us all not to take life too seriously. His cartoons have been published in USA TODAY, Playboy, Field and flow, WIDFOWL Magazine, Outside of Wisconsin, and dozens of other publications. He was also an award-winning Life Member of the Outdoor Writers Association of America. In 2017, he won the OWAA’s most prestigious award for excellence in craftsmanship. He is also the author of 15 books.

From Outdoor Writers Association of America (circa 2009):

Cochran has been drawing since he was a “tiny kid”. His mother and older sister were artists. His mother mainly painted landscapes and was good at both oil and watercolour. His sister, Adrienne, worked as an illustrator for the Daily Oklahoman in Oklahoma City.
“A lot of people ask me, ‘How did you get into the cartoon?’ I kind of have a standard answer for them, but it’s true,” Cochran said. “I always say, ‘Well, if you’re drawing all over your textbooks instead of reading them, by the time you get out of school, the only thing you’re qualified for is a draftsman.’ It’s true, actually. What else could I do? I never learned anything else.”

As a child, Cochran spent quite a bit of time outdoors as a scout, before joining the Exploring program as a teenager. “We used to go out and camp where we mostly took our guns and fishing rods and went to live off the land,” Cochran recalls. “I ate a robin once and a woodpecker and all sorts of weird stuff, whatever you could get.”

These days, Cochran hunts turkeys and deer on a few hundred acres of land he shares with four other people. “It’s nothing out of the ordinary,” Cochran said. “But we have a nice little house up there with five bedrooms and a few bathrooms.” Cochran is also an avid fly-fisherman.

Which explains Bruce’s fame as a sports designer.

Excerpt from Realtree “Friends, Family and the Outdoors” (2010):

Most celebrities and outdoor writers take their jobs seriously…

But not Cochran. He mocks, teases and makes fun of sports people on a daily basis. As a result, Cochran’s playful look at the world of hunting and fishing has entertained us for decades. Since the 1960s, his cartoons, stories and illustrations have graced the pages of many outdoor magazines and books.

Cochran got his start as an illustrator right out of college. “I went to work for Hallmark Cards in 1960, writing and illustrating contemporary cards,” he said. “From there, I got into comics for magazines and local ad agencies.”

Since then, Cochran’s work has appeared in Ducks Unlimited, Field & Stream, North American Hunter, Petersen’s Bowhunting, Pheasants Forever Journal and many more.

Among those many others are National Lampoon, The Realist, Playboy (and Fling and Gallery, etc.), Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and just about every fishing and hunting magazine you can think of.

For Cochran, it’s about writing jokes. “For me, cartooning is a form of writing,” he continued. “I’ve been thinking about jokes for over four decades and have developed a routine that works for me. First, I limit my thinking to a particular category – say deer hunting or trout fishing. Sometimes , it helps my brain to flip through hunting and fishing magazines and catalogs, or read outdoor websites.And, I usually carry a small notebook and a pen every time I go out on hunting or fishing trips, and when I read magazines and websites If something happens or I read something that brings up a memory of an experience that happened years ago, it It’s a good idea for a cartoon, I write it down. Then later, I try to exaggerate these situations. The joke is often the result of my brain telling me, “What if this had happened at the instead of that? Then I keep developing until I’m happy with the joke.

“I write cartoon ideas best in the morning, and even then I can only do it for about an hour. After that, I start to lose focus,” Cochran continued. jokingly, I sketch it roughly in pencil, and I mean roughly, like in stick figures. If I come up with 10 or 15 cartoon ideas, I consider that a productive morning. I will file these rough sketches for a few days, weeks or months. Later, I’ll go through my pile of sketches and select the best ideas, often refining the callouts and tweaking the designs. I will then do a final pencil drawing on tracing paper and send the drafts to the editors. If a publisher wants to buy the cartoon, I’ll finish it in ink, color it (if needed), scan it, and email it to my client.

“I was very lucky,” Cochran explained. “Looking back on my career (which I hope isn’t over yet) I can’t think of anything I would have done differently, but overall I think I would have been more enterprising. I probably should have looked for other ways to increase my income sooner. I tried a few comics, and for a while hoped to become an animal watercolor artist, and tried a few books that I couldn’t sell well, before finding success with Buck Fever. But, when you have house and car payments, and a wife and two kids to support, you’re just not too keen on taking risks. But in the beginning, I had some stability with my income with my Hallmark contract, and I sold a lot of cartoons for magazines and did as much publicity work as I wanted. And for nine years, I worked as a cartoonist for USA Today, so we got along.

The Fun ‘n’ Games with Cochran! panel appeared in USA Today from 1983 to 1991, Bruce cartoons began appearing in Playboy in 1960, and by the early 1970s he had a regular spot on National Lampoon’s Funny Pages with his School of Famous Comics Artists comic strip which, of course, frequently featured animals.


Bruce’s humor has extended beyond cartoons to writing books and articles.

More cartoons, illustrations and paintings by Bruce Cochran on his website.



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Cartoonist Jules Feiffer sells Shelter Island home https://robertdejesus.com/cartoonist-jules-feiffer-sells-shelter-island-home/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 12:55:56 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/cartoonist-jules-feiffer-sells-shelter-island-home/ The Shelter Island home of Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Jules Feiffer has been sold. Feiffer, whose work appears on this week’s cover of Dan’s papers, Behind the hedges sister publication, and his wife, JZ Holden, put their home on the market in May for $1,199,000. The charming home at 5 Emerson Lane sold for $1.1 million […]]]>

The Shelter Island home of Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist Jules Feiffer has been sold.

Feiffer, whose work appears on this week’s cover of Dan’s papers, Behind the hedges sister publication, and his wife, JZ Holden, put their home on the market in May for $1,199,000.

The charming home at 5 Emerson Lane sold for $1.1 million on August 19, 2022. Douglas Elliman’s Dawn Watson was representing the sellers. The 0.62 acre property borders 45 acres of unspoilt land, including the airstrip that is Klenawincus Airfield.

The pastoral views from 5 Emerson Lane on Shelter Island.Courtesy of Douglas Elliman

“Shelter Island is such a magical place, and this property is an example of that,” Watson told Hedges when the home went on the market. “It’s easy to see what attracts creatives like Jules and JZ. The view is beautiful in its simplicity. Just the field, flora, fauna and the occasional small motor plane passing by. I love sitting at the dining room table or on the patio and soaking up all that tranquility and charm. Talk about million dollar views! There’s no other place in the East End quite like it.

Jules Feiffer, Shelter Island
The house at 5 Emerson Lane on Shelter Island.Courtesy of Douglas Elliman

Douglas Elliman’s Doug Brown brought in the buyer.

Built in 2016, the 1,710 square foot clapboard-style home features wood floors, a fireplace, and a ground-level owner’s suite. In total there are three bedrooms and two bathrooms, plus a full basement. A patio overlooks the reserve.

The new owners can install a swimming pool because there is plenty of room.

Jules Feiffer, Shelter Island
Inside the Feiffer house just soldCourtesy of Douglas Elliman

The 93-year-old artist, considered one of the country’s most widely read satirists, has written more than 35 books, plays and screenplays and has seen his cartoons and illustrations. His work has appeared in The New York Timesthe London Observer, the new yorker, Playboy, and Squire, among many others.

Feiffer, who was inducted into the Comic Book Hall of Fame, wrote the Oscar-winning animated short Munrothe provocative and revolutionary film, carnal knowledgeand the musical feature film Popeye, as well as plays Small murders, knock knock, and People of Feiffere and T booksHe Phantom Tollbooth, The Man on the Ceiling and kill my motherr.

Feiffer and Holden have lived full-time on Shelter Island since 2017, according to The New York Post. Ownership records show he bought it for $629,000 that year.

E-mail tvecsey@danspapers.com with comments, questions or advice. Follow Behind the Hedges on Twitter, instagram and Facebook.

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Israeli cartoonist says Marvel copied superhero Sabra, he’d sue if he had the means https://robertdejesus.com/israeli-cartoonist-says-marvel-copied-superhero-sabra-hed-sue-if-he-had-the-means/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 20:45:00 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/israeli-cartoonist-says-marvel-copied-superhero-sabra-hed-sue-if-he-had-the-means/ An Israeli comic artist has been attracting attention since Marvel announced on Saturday that it cast actress Shira Haas for Israeli superhero Sabra. He claims the character is based on a superhero he created when he was 15, although he says he won’t sue the American entertainment giant because he can’t afford it. . In […]]]>

An Israeli comic artist has been attracting attention since Marvel announced on Saturday that it cast actress Shira Haas for Israeli superhero Sabra. He claims the character is based on a superhero he created when he was 15, although he says he won’t sue the American entertainment giant because he can’t afford it. .

In 1978, Uri Fink created Sabraman, a series of comics about an Israeli superhero whose outfit, colors and symbols seem to resemble those associated with Sabra, a little-known character who first appeared in comics. Marvel comics two years later.

Haas, who rose to international fame through his starring role in the hit Netflix series “Unorthodox,” will play Sabra in the upcoming “Captain America” ​​movie, set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and titled “New World Order.” according to multiple reports Saturday.

In the comics, Sabra, aka Ruth Bat-Seraph, is a former superhuman agent for the Mossad spy agency who occasionally clashes with other superhuman characters such as the Hulk and the X-Men. Her powers include exceptional strength and endurance, and her costume often incorporates the Israeli flag and Star of David.

Sabra, in Hebrew”tsabaris the local term for the fruit of the cactus (commonly called prickly pear). It has long been a term for Jews born in Israel.

Fink tweeted Sunday morning that he woke up to countless tags and messages telling him it was “time to sue Marvel and make some big bucks.”

He said his editor and co-creator David Herman considered doing just that when Sabra first appeared in 1980, but Fink convinced him otherwise. He said there was no chance of succeeding against Marvel’s attorneys and it was doubtful he even had a case because he doesn’t own the copyright to the word “sabra.” , and Sabra’s superpowers were different from Sabraman’s.

“Nothing has changed since, except Marvel is now part of Disney, with even more monstrous lawyers, so it’s not worth it,” Fink wrote.

“It’s pretty clear to me that at the time someone [at Marvel] saw the hype around Sabraman – there was an article in People Magazine! — and went with the idea,” he said. “But I can’t do anything except maybe try to draw attention to the superhero I started my career with.”

Fink told the Ynet news site that if he had the means, he “definitely” would. have sued Marvel, but that as things stand, it would be “crazy” to take legal action against a huge conglomerate like Disney.

Israeli actress Shira Haas accepts the award for Best Supporting Actress at the 2018 Ophir Awards, sometimes referred to as the Israeli Oscars, in the city of Ashdod, southern Israel, September 6, 2018. (Flash90)

Fink also issued a few words of warning to Haas.

“I don’t predict his portrayal in Marvel will be positive in wake up days like these,” he told Ynet, adding in a separate interview with Channel 12 news: “Those who work at Marvel today are all kinds of progressives. I have nothing against them, but we won’t get the most accurate description of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

“I suggest that Shira carefully read [the script], so that the character is not portrayed in an overly problematic way,” he added. “On the other hand, it’s a tremendous opportunity because Marvel has learned to take their most esoteric characters and make them into great characters. Shira has an incredible opportunity.

Meanwhile, pro-Palestinian social media users have criticized Marvel for featuring an Israeli superhero in the first place.

And some pro-Israel users have warned that the character’s arc could prove unflattering to the Jewish state.

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Cartoonist Art Spiegelman set to receive honorary National Book Award https://robertdejesus.com/cartoonist-art-spiegelman-set-to-receive-honorary-national-book-award/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 15:24:27 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/cartoonist-art-spiegelman-set-to-receive-honorary-national-book-award/ NEW YORK (AP) — This fall, Art Spiegelman will receive an honorary National Book Award for his outstanding contribution to American letters. He feels honored and a little worried. The unexpected delight of being cited by the National Book Foundation comes months after the jarring saga of its Pulitzer Prize-winning “Maus” was pulled by a […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) — This fall, Art Spiegelman will receive an honorary National Book Award for his outstanding contribution to American letters. He feels honored and a little worried.

The unexpected delight of being cited by the National Book Foundation comes months after the jarring saga of its Pulitzer Prize-winning “Maus” was pulled by a Tennessee school board, which found Spiegelman’s graphic novel on the Holocaust inappropriate for the district curriculum. Sales of “Maus” and other Spiegelman books surged, but attention diverted him from other priorities.

“My work schedule has just been totally shattered,” he said in a recent phone interview. “I was happy to go back to my hiding place.”

Now, 74-year-old Spiegelman plans to be back in the world, an admittedly enviable burden that will require him to set aside time and consider his decades-long, deep and far-reaching legacy. His influence ranges from “Maus,” winner of a Pulitzer Judges Special Citation in 1992, to his 1970s work in underground comics to his famous New Yorker covers, including the shadowy silhouettes of the Twin Towers that have ran two weeks after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

“Art Spiegelman has captured the imagination of the world through the medium of comics,” David Steinberger, chairman of the board of the National Book Foundation, said in a statement released Friday. “His masterful graphic novels tackle and illuminate topics ranging from the Holocaust to the aftermath of 9/11, as well as the personal intimacy of the people, events, and comics that shaped him as an artist. The groundbreaking work by Spiegelman showed us the limitless possibilities of comics as a form of literary art.

Born in Stockholm, Spiegelman was a toddler when his family emigrated to the United States in the early 1950s. He is descended from Polish Jews and lost dozens of relatives – including his brother Rysio – during the Holocaust, a tragic story from which he was inspired for “Maus”. His cartooning career dates back to his teens, when he contributed art to Smudge and other fanzines and produced his own publication, “Blasé.”

Spiegelman’s career is, in part, a story of taking an art form associated with children and reshaping it for adults, what he calls “investigating the language and nature of comics.” He is the first cartoonist to win the DCAL Medal from the National Book Foundation, which has previously awarded Toni Morrison, Philip Roth and Robert Caro among others.

“It’s very different from what was happening in the 70s, where being a cartoonist basically meant – unless you were Charles Schulz – you weren’t in the big leagues. It was more like being a tattoo artist says Spiegelman.

“But the world is changing. There was a cultural shift that made it less pejorative to do comics. You had a time in the 1950s where comic book bans were happening across America. Comics were considered dangerous, and you had this fight over what kids should be allowed to see. There was a rating system (the Comics Code) and a lot of it didn’t make sense. But the genie came out of the bottle a long time ago.

Neil Gaiman will introduce Spiegelman at the Nov. 16 ceremony, presented by the Book Foundation. American Library Association executive director Tracie D. Hall will receive an award for outstanding service to the American literary community, and winners will be announced in five competitive categories, from fiction to children’s literature.

In a recent phone interview, Gaiman said Spiegelman had a lasting impact on him. He recalled seeing some of Spiegelman’s “Maus” images about 40 years ago and relating them to his own experiences as a parent of Jewish Holocaust survivors.

“It left imprints on my soul,” he says of Spiegelman’s work.

They became friends years later, although Gaiman, who remembers turning down the chance to meet David Bowie and Elvis Costello among others, had an unofficial rule not to meet his heroes. But he said his admiration and affection for Spiegelman only deepened, and he was not surprised that Spiegelman worried that winning the DCAL would disrupt his work schedule.

“It’s Art,” he said. “Art, with a capital ‘A’, is always thinking about art, with a lowercase ‘a’. He does things that matter, and I think he knows he does things that matter, and I think we’re ridiculously lucky to have him.

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Lucien De Gieter joins the TDC Senior Strippers Club https://robertdejesus.com/lucien-de-gieter-joins-the-tdc-senior-strippers-club/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 00:43:21 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/lucien-de-gieter-joins-the-tdc-senior-strippers-club/ Home / Section: Birthdays Lucien De Gieter joins the TDC senior stripper club Lucien de Gieterborn September 4, 1932, is 90 years old today and becomes one of the Daily Cartoonist’s senior strippers. Lucien’s entry at Comiclopedia Lambiek: Lucien De Gieter is a Belgian comics artist, since the 1960s a leading artist for Spirou […]]]>

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Lucien De Gieter joins the TDC senior stripper club

Lucien de Gieterborn September 4, 1932, is 90 years old today
and becomes one of the Daily Cartoonist’s senior strippers.


Lucien’s entry at Comiclopedia Lambiek:

Lucien De Gieter is a Belgian comics artist, since the 1960s a leading artist for Spirou magazine and best known for his ‘Papyrus’ comic series.

De Gieter began his association with Spirou magazine in 1961 and published his first comic strips in the magazine’s center print mini-book collection. He has written several stories for artists such as Eddy Ryssack, Jem, Francis and Kiko, and he has also created his own comic about the little cowboy ‘Pony’ in this section.


images © the respective copyright holders

De Gieter went to work for Peyo’s studio on Avenue de Boetendael in Uccle in mid-1965. He helped ink ‘Les Schtroumpfs’ until 1968 and made new gags with ‘Poussy’ at from 1969.

His series “Tôôôt et Puit”, on a young pearl fisherman and a mermaid, was published in Spirou from 1966, and “Pony” also found its place in the regular pages of the magazine in 1968.

An index of comics by Lucien published in Siprou.

From the Papyrus wiki:

In 1974, the first pages of “Papyrus” were released by SPIROU. This Egyptian saga quickly turns into a classic, the success of which even allows its author to visit the country from which he draws his inspiration for a long time and several times. Under the revealing title of “The Wonderful Adventures of Papyrus”, these albums recount the tribulations of the young fisherman Papyrus and Princess Théti Chéri, daughter of the pharaoh Merenptah, in a reconstruction of ancient Egypt at the time.

Happy birthday Lucian!

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