Cartoonist – Robert De Jesus http://robertdejesus.com/ Mon, 16 May 2022 05:15:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://robertdejesus.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-7.png Cartoonist – Robert De Jesus http://robertdejesus.com/ 32 32 Vancouver cartoonist named Pulitzer finalist https://robertdejesus.com/vancouver-cartoonist-named-pulitzer-finalist/ Fri, 13 May 2022 19:37:00 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/vancouver-cartoonist-named-pulitzer-finalist/ A Vancouver woman is still in shock after being named a finalist for one of publishing’s most prestigious awards. Zoe Si’s work has been seen by millions, splashed across the pages of The New Yorker and this week she learned she was up for a Pulitzer Prize for several of her designs. It’s a recognition […]]]>

A Vancouver woman is still in shock after being named a finalist for one of publishing’s most prestigious awards.

Zoe Si’s work has been seen by millions, splashed across the pages of The New Yorker and this week she learned she was up for a Pulitzer Prize for several of her designs.

It’s a recognition that Si calls “very, very surreal” after making a big career change at the height of the pandemic.

The 31-year-old graduated from the University of British Columbia in 2013 and was a practicing lawyer until about two years ago.

It was then that she decided to trade courtrooms for cartoons, in order to document her life.

“I started doing cartoons to solve problems on my own because life was hard and drawing cartoons about something…you make yourself laugh,” Si told CTV News Vancouver.

“I didn’t start this adventure wanting to become an editorial cartoonist or a journalist, I just came with the experience of documenting my life.”

But it was a decision that quickly paid off.

“I was processing my feelings by drawing about them and The New Yorker kept picking them up,” Si said.

The Pulitzer Prize Administration describes Si’s illustrations as demonstrating “inclusive representation and well-observed punchlines to capture political realities and everyday life during the pandemic.”

“It’s definitely unexpected, that really wasn’t the goal at all this year,” Si said.

Although she initially didn’t plan to make drawing a full-time career, Si said she started taking up pen to cope with stress when she was in law school.

“I started a website where I set myself the goal of posting a cartoon every day for a year…my online followers just grew organically,” she said.

“When I became a lawyer, I kept drawing cartoons about my daily life…it was just a fun way to let off steam and people thought it was pretty relevant.”

Si said she didn’t know editorial cartoonists could win a Pulitzer Prize until 2020, when longtime New Yorker contributor Barry Blitt won one.

“When I found out about this…I thought this would be my 30-year plan,” she said. “I can maybe expect that when I’m in my 50s and then of course it happened this year… so it was super overwhelming but very empowering.”

Si has now set her sights on the future, when she plans to continue drawing cartoons for The New Yorker and illustrating children’s books. She hopes this will eventually lead to a book deal.

“The next thing I’m going to try to do is write a children’s book or a graphic novel,” she said. “Just keep finding ways to connect with people and convince them of the legitimacy of cartoons as a serious means of communication.”


With files from Nafeesa Karim of CTV News Vancouver

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The designer is the secret ingredient of this Slasher movie! https://robertdejesus.com/the-designer-is-the-secret-ingredient-of-this-slasher-movie/ Wed, 11 May 2022 07:10:09 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/the-designer-is-the-secret-ingredient-of-this-slasher-movie/ Michael Spivey illustrates over 60 cartoons as “Geoffrey Loftidottir” for SPREAD: Pigs to Slaughter (The Magazine Plus Editorial): — Los Angeles, Calif., May 10, 2022 (Issuewire.com) — There’s not much new to the slasher genre since its inception with Psycho in the ’60s, then Halloween and Friday the 13th in the 70s and 80s except […]]]>

Michael Spivey illustrates over 60 cartoons as “Geoffrey Loftidottir” for SPREAD: Pigs to Slaughter

(The Magazine Plus Editorial): — Los Angeles, Calif., May 10, 2022 (Issuewire.com) — There’s not much new to the slasher genre since its inception with Psycho in the ’60s, then Halloween and Friday the 13th in the 70s and 80s except for the twists introduced by Kevin Wiliamson and Wes Craven with Scream in the late 90s. Until now. Until “SPREAD: Pigs to Slaughter” (IMDB page: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt19371340/). Until Hamson: The Curious Pig and its creator Geoffrey Loftidottir. In reality, there is no Loftidottir but thanks to talented comic artist, Michael Spivey, the world may never know.

While Robert Christopher Smith and Kurt Belcher wrote the script for “SPREAD: Pigs to Slaughter” and created the characters for cartoonist Geoffrey Loftidottir and “Hamson,” it took illustrator Michael Spivey to flesh out the character and produce over 60″ Hamson: The Curious”. Pig comics. Spivey, born in KY like Smith and Belcher, is himself a writer and creator, in fact, a “Rushton Award Winning Playwright” his senior year at Union College. He says that when Smith and Belcher first cast him, they didn’t reveal anything about their storyline or how this character would actually play a pivotal role. “ just described the character of “Hamson” and told me a crazy story about a cartoonist who kind of lost his mind after the character was hijacked by fringe-right crazies. Once the two shared their script with Spivey, everything clicked.

“SPREAD: Pigs to Slaughter” is a slasher movie and like “Scream” before it has two killers, which is established from the start of the movie. Both killers are wearing halloween-like pig masks. As the story unfolds from there, we’re introduced to both “Hamson” and its mysterious creator Geoffrey Loftidottir. Almost every character in the movie has a Hamson tattoo on their body somewhere as “Hamson” memes spread through their world. One character, a moody emo-boy in his thirties named Derek swears to be friends with Loftidottir who he believes is now missing and knows more about Hamson than anyone in the film. Loftidottir, although he never appears on screen, is set up like all the other characters in the film as a red herring with the potential to be one of the killers.

At one point, as Derek regales his friends with some of Lofitdottir’s dark history, a series of comic strips illustrated by Spivey appear on screen, switching on and off along with the story. told. Due to Spivey’s extensive effort and passion for the film as a whole, Smith and Belcher ensured that he shared credit for the creation of the character and the tapes, off-screen and on. Spivey will be considered a project partner in the same way as the cast and crew and his name will appear in the credits alongside these other creators. Much like the fictional Loftidottir, Michael Spivey is a prolific cartoonist who posts his “The Round File” and “Every Tuesday at Joe’s” for free to his fans on social media. “Hamson: The Curious Pig” comics are available weekly at www.Procrastagram.com

ABOUT THE BROADCAST: Pigs to Kill

BROADCASTING: Pigs to Slaughter is a horror film shot in September 2022 by Robert Christopher Smith for his Lethal Voice Entertainment. The production features an exciting cast including Melody Parra, Ian S. Peterson, Sarah Moliski, Erika Marks, Stepone Davis, Jacob Athyal, Baracha Walston and Makenna Perkal. While fitting neatly into the Slasher genre, this film proves to be much more comprised of intense thriller, dark comedy, and even political satire. Audiences will be introduced to SPREAD: Pigs to Slaughter throughout 2023 at film festivals around the world.

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‘People laugh but think twice’: Belgian cartoonist tackles plastic pollution | Belgium https://robertdejesus.com/people-laugh-but-think-twice-belgian-cartoonist-tackles-plastic-pollution-belgium/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:37:00 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/people-laugh-but-think-twice-belgian-cartoonist-tackles-plastic-pollution-belgium/ Belgian cartoonist Pieter De Poortere tried to do his part for the environment: eat less meat and diligently sort his waste – glass, paper, plastics. He realized that was not enough. “I thought if we sorted all of our waste, then everything would be recycled, everything would be fine, then we would do just fine. […]]]>

Belgian cartoonist Pieter De Poortere tried to do his part for the environment: eat less meat and diligently sort his waste – glass, paper, plastics. He realized that was not enough. “I thought if we sorted all of our waste, then everything would be recycled, everything would be fine, then we would do just fine. But in fact, that’s not true,” he said, pointing to the problems of the global waste industry, where plastic from rich countries can be thrown away or burned on open fires in countries. poorer.

So he put his best-known character to work, as part of an international art project launched in April, aimed at bringing attention to the problem of plastic production.

Pieter De Poortere, creator of Dickie. Photograph: Jennifer Rankin/The Guardian

Dickie, a chubby anti-hero with a bristly mustache, is a perpetual loser, whether as a farmer, astronaut, fairytale hero, or biblical character. “I always try to imagine what’s the worst thing that can happen to Dickie,” De Poortere said of the character he created nearly two decades ago, which now has a permanent home at the Museum of comics in Brussels.

Known as Boerke in the original Flemish, the series is drawn in a childlike style, but with sharp dark humor aimed directly at adults. It has won awards in Belgium, a country where comics are celebrated as high art.

After years of mishaps, Dickie is now wreaking havoc on the environment – striking a disastrous deal with “Plastics Inc”, or shooting a kangaroo in a misguided attempt to reduce packaging waste. “A lot of my work is very ambiguous,” said De Poortere. “Dickie is sometimes bad, sometimes he’s good, sometimes he’s a loser, sometimes he’s really greedy, he’s selfish, he uses people… People start reading him and they laugh, but often they have to think twice, is it really happening?”

Camille Duran, founder of the Sweden-based Cosmic Foundation, the organization behind Magnify, the art project featuring De Poortere’s work, said the project’s aim was to attract people’s attention to the production of plastics, not just the consumption. “Although demand will start to decline as policy becomes more ambitious, more [petrochemicals] installations are allowed worldwide.

Earlier this year, 173 countries pledged to develop a legally binding treaty by 2024 to end plastic pollution. The deal, which will include measures to tackle plastic production, has been described as the most important multilateral environmental agreement since the Paris climate accord. Yet, according to current trends, plastic production is expected to double over the next 20 years and by 2050 could account for 15% of the global annual carbon budget.

Duran, who hopes to expand the project to other parts of the world, started by choosing three artists near some of the world’s biggest petrochemical hotspots: Louisiana, Taiwan and Antwerp.

The Boerke comic strip.
“There is tragedy in this myopia, but also the basis of a lot of humor.” The Boerke comic strip. Photography: Nanuq for De Hofleveranciers.

Organizers hope the Dickie Pages will help galvanize opposition to a giant plastics factory in Antwerp, planned by British petrochemical company Ineos. Activists have launched a legal challenge to Antwerp’s decision to grant Ineos a permit to build a chemical facility to make ethylene from fractured US shale gas.

Campaigners say the project will fuel single-use plastics and falls short of EU climate targets. Ineos counters that the facility will be the greenest of its kind and help produce sustainable plastics used in technology and healthcare.

De Poortere’s sequence on plastics is broadcast throughout May in the Dutch-language weekly Knack. The artist plans to include the pages in a 50-page book covering other environmental emergencies, including global warming, to be published in 2023.

De Poortere, who was born in Ghent, knows Antwerp well, but has chosen not to situate his work in a particular place, to preserve a universal message.

“It’s important to get this message out to the public – and not in an annoying way – but through art, through humor, trying to convince people, just to make them think. I want to show a little absurdity Humans, he added, can’t stop doing “stupid things that will harm us. There’s tragedy in this myopia, but it’s also the basis of a lot of humor.”

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The cartoonist America’s right-wing political establishment loves to hate https://robertdejesus.com/the-cartoonist-americas-right-wing-political-establishment-loves-to-hate/ Sun, 08 May 2022 20:06:00 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/the-cartoonist-americas-right-wing-political-establishment-loves-to-hate/ If you’ve been online, and especially on Twitter, you’re probably familiar with Eli Valley’s name and his brushwork drawings that use the grotesque and the absurd to make larger points about life, culture, and culture. Politics. But it wasn’t until the Trump administration that the New York-based cartoonist was thrust into the public spotlight. Valley […]]]>

If you’ve been online, and especially on Twitter, you’re probably familiar with Eli Valley’s name and his brushwork drawings that use the grotesque and the absurd to make larger points about life, culture, and culture. Politics. But it wasn’t until the Trump administration that the New York-based cartoonist was thrust into the public spotlight. Valley has come under attack from a wide range of politicians, especially Republicans, including Meghan McCain, who called the comic strip he drew of her “one of the most anti-Semitic things I’ve ever seen. “. McCain is not Jewish, and Valley is, not to mention that his father is a rabbi.

In this conversation, I asked Valley to tell us about how he got his start in comics, how he built on the long history of satire and graphic humor in the American Jewish tradition, and how he faces the public spotlight as he struggles to survive. as a full-time artist.

This podcast is accompanied by researcher Josh Lambert’s article, which explores the historical roots of Valley’s art. Lambert writes, “Valley comes naturally through its most pressing and recurring theme: the lies told and the violence committed in the name of Jewish safety and security. His cartoon jeremiads can easily fit into a long history of Jewish protest, from biblical prophets who excoriated sinners from Israel to modern novelists who, like late 19th-century San Francisco writer Emma Wolf, criminally underestimated, wrote of Jews, as she put it, “in the spirit of love – love that has the courage to point out a fault in its object”.

The music for this episode is “A Mineral Love” by Bibio, courtesy of Warp Records.

Subscribe to Hyperallergic on Apple Podcasts and anywhere you listen to podcasts.

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Veteran cartoonist Gado honored by France https://robertdejesus.com/veteran-cartoonist-gado-honored-by-france/ Sun, 08 May 2022 08:47:01 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/veteran-cartoonist-gado-honored-by-france/ Veteran cartoonists, Godfrey Mwapembwa popularly known as Gaddo, and Paul Kelemba alias Maddo, were, on Saturday May 7, honored by the French Ministry of Culture for their work in favor of freedom of expression. Mwapembwa and Kelemba were named Chevaliers de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres for their role in promoting democracy through comics […]]]>

Veteran cartoonists, Godfrey Mwapembwa popularly known as Gaddo, and Paul Kelemba alias Maddo, were, on Saturday May 7, honored by the French Ministry of Culture for their work in favor of freedom of expression.

Mwapembwa and Kelemba were named Chevaliers de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres for their role in promoting democracy through comics at the Cartooning for Peace exhibition held at the Alliance Française from Nairobi.

The two were congratulated by dignitaries including the French Embassy headed by Ambassador Aline Kuster-Ménager and Ole Thonke, Danish Ambassador to Kenya.

Cartoonist Godfrey Mwapemba (Gado) delivers a speech.

Twitter

Hongera (congratulations) Maddo and Gaddo receiving the Knight in the Order of Arts and Lettersfor your role and your impact in defending freedom of expression through caricature,” wrote Ambassador Kuster-Ménager.

“Congratulations to Gaddo and Maddo for the French Lifetime Achievement Award for Promoting Freedom of Expression in Kenya through Cartoons. It was a pleasure following you,” said the Danish Ambassador.

Cartooning for Peace is a forum that brings together press cartoonists from around the world who use cartooning to better understand social issues. Its current members include 252 journalists from around the world.

Gaddo, a visual artist from Tanzania, currently works as a cartoonist for The standard. He is a maestro in his field, known for his boldness in illustrating relevant issues spanning politics and socio-economic issues.

Creative, he is at the origin of the Display XYZ and co-founder of Buni Media, a Nairobi-based company. His works brought him fame while others got him into bad books with the government.

Locally, a cartoon showing President Uhuru Kenyatta and his deputy, William Ruto, dangling bullets, representing the case before the International Criminal Court (ICC) did not please. Back home, East Africa, was temporarily closed by President Jakaya Kikwete because of a cartoon he authored.

The cartoonist has won several awards, including the Kenya National Human Rights Commission Journalism Awards in 2005 and 2007, the 2007 Prince Claus Award and the Cartoon for Peace Award.

On the other hand, Kelemba, who is behind It’s a Madd Madd World, is a self-taught visual artist who integrates comics and comedy to tackle issues. He works alongside Gaddo at Buni Media, where he is a producer.

Kelemba has received international recognition, including residencies at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Italy. In 2015, he received the 2015 CNN Multi-Choice African Journalist Awards.

a

A funny trolling cartoon Education CS George Magoha printed on Wednesday, January 6, 2021

The standard

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Why Strib editorial cartoonist Steve Sack decided it was time to sign https://robertdejesus.com/why-strib-editorial-cartoonist-steve-sack-decided-it-was-time-to-sign/ Thu, 05 May 2022 22:19:31 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/why-strib-editorial-cartoonist-steve-sack-decided-it-was-time-to-sign/ Steve Sack can’t remember exactly how old he was when he drew his first cartoon – pre-kindergarten, sure. But he remembers what it was and where he found the paper to draw it on. “I drew a picture of a dinosaur, showed it to my mom, and she was thrilled,” he said. “I can’t tell […]]]>

Steve Sack can’t remember exactly how old he was when he drew his first cartoon – pre-kindergarten, sure. But he remembers what it was and where he found the paper to draw it on.

“I drew a picture of a dinosaur, showed it to my mom, and she was thrilled,” he said. “I can’t tell you how supercharged it was. For a small child, you make your mom happy, you want to start over. It was my encouragement.

“My grandfather worked for the railroad. He gave us pads of paper and pencils. I guess he stole stationery from the office. As soon as I was old enough, I opened this drawer, took out my paper and made my little drawings.

This little kid from West St. Paul eventually found a much wider audience as a Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for the Star Tribune. Five days a week for more than four decades, Sack has delighted readers (most of them, anyway) with a distinctive blend of pointed opinion, whimsy, and mischief.

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The best cartoonists, like the best columnists, make readers laugh, cry and think. It’s Sack, whose pencil and politics lean to the left. By awarding him the Pulitzer in 2013 (he was a finalist three other times), the Pulitzer Council quoted his “vivid, distinctive cartoons that used creative metaphors for high-impact results”.

Recently, however, Sack’s cartoons disappeared from the pages of the Strib. Its last confusing ex-president Donald Trump and Fox News host Tucker Carlson for their support of Russian President Vladimir Putin, published on February 26. Then, nothing, for almost two months. Some readers feared a recurrence of the cancer that forced Sack to take sick leave in 2018.

It was not this. About eight months ago, Sack said, he began to feel numbness in the fingers of his right hand (drawing). Numbness and tingling quickly spread to his whole hand, then to his arm, up to his shoulder. A neurologist diagnosed carpal tunnel syndrome and nerve problems.

Although Sack, 68, has had surgery and says his hand is “sort of” improving, he has decided to retire. Because the drawing remains problematic, he signed via a short write-up in the Sunday Strib on April 24.

“I just have trouble getting my hand to do precisely what I want it to do,” Sack said in a phone interview. “For my drawing, I need this fine motor skills, these delicate little lines that I want to draw.

“It’s like writing. There are a lot of different moves in everything you do. You move the pencil up and down and side to side. Until then, I had complete mastery of it, so I noticed it right away. I welcomed it for a while, but then it started to feel more and more pronounced. So I saw a neurologist and looked into it.

All his life, cartooning has been as second nature to Sack as breathing. Besides his work on Strib, he collaborated for years with another artist on Doodles, a Sunday cartoon for children featuring puzzles, riddles and word games. “I wanted an excuse to draw monsters and aliens and all the stuff I used to do when I was little,” said Sack, who quit Doodles a few years ago. Even lying in a hospital bed and undergoing cancer treatment, Sack drew cartoons. “It’s hard for me to imagine not doing it,” he said.

And readers couldn’t imagine going without their daily cartoon Sack. More than 2,000 people reacted to Sack’s retirement announcement on his Facebook page, while more than 1,000 left comments. Sack said he received hundreds of emails from readers, friends, former and current colleagues, even people from his old neighborhood of West St. Paul. He tries to answer everyone, but typing makes his carpal tunnel worse. A lifelong two-finger typist, Sack has found himself down to one, and things are moving slowly.

“You feel like there are people watching and reading,” Sack said. “But I have to say I was really stunned and blown away by the reaction.

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“The most touching was a woman who said that she had seen all my cartoons and loved them. She said that several years ago, due to a health problem, she had lost her view, and she would have her husband read them and describe them to her every day. It just kind of blew my mind.

Editorial cartoonists are a dying breed in today’s ever-shrinking newspaper industry, and Sack’s retirement isn’t helping. Today there are less than 30 full-time cartoonist jobs in newspapers, according to the Association of American Editorial Cartoonistsdown from around 150 in the early 1980s. The Pioneer Press lost the talented Kirk Anderson over a decade ago in one of their many downsizings, leaving Sack alone in the Twin Cities.

Some newspapers rely on syndicated cartoons to save money, while others don’t run them at all, avoiding the backlash when a cartoon angers a readership cohort or an advertiser. with deep pockets.

Steve Bag

But Sack thinks there’s still a place in the short-attention-span 24/7 news cycle for a well-executed political cartoon, even if it annoys readers. “I think the reaction I got from our readers would speak for it,” he said.

And don’t run Sack on editors that completely remove cartoons. “We’ve always provoked readers, and there’s always someone who’s not going to like it, some more intensely than others,” he said. “Editors used to understand that. It was part of the deal. But lately, it seems some publishers are being overly cautious with this. One guy said, if he could find a cartoonist who could please everyone, he would direct it. Well, good luck with that. You might as well publish Marmaduke on the editorial page.

Twice in his career, Sack worried about being the next cartoonist: first, when the Minneapolis Star and Tribune merged in 1982 (the Tribune had hired him the year before, so he lacked seniority ), then when Avista Capital Partners bought the Strib from McClatchy in 2007. The first time around, the Strib opted to keep both cartoonist Sack and Star Craig MacIntosh; they later collaborated on Doodles. The second time around, Sack said he was among more than 100 Avista staff members targeted for takeovers.

“My name was put on that list,” he said. “I didn’t put my name on that list. But it was like someone was trying to ask me out. I had no intention of taking it.

“Honestly, I really wasn’t worried about it. I had enough seniority that they pretty much hollowed out the paper before they got to me. I was more concerned with what they were doing. We lost a lot of good people when these guys owned us. A consortium of New York investment bankers is as charming as it sounds. They emptied us. They were horrible. They bankrupted us. Thank goodness for Glen Taylor (who bought the Strib in 2014).

So what’s next for the Strib? Editorial page editor Scott Gillespie said the paper had not decided to hire another editorial cartoonist. For now, they are airing a mix of syndicated cartoons.

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“We will review the pool of potential candidates, consider how best to use our resources, and take a fresh look at all possible options,” Gillespie wrote in an email. “I’m grateful we haven’t had to answer that question for over 40 years.”

As for Sack, he is meeting with Strib executives this week to discuss revising The First And Only Book of Sack, a collection of his Strib work published in 2017. He enjoys painting in oils and thinks about sculpture and painting. 3d art.

And though Sack’s hand may betray him, his spirit remains intact. “In some of the letters I got from readers this week, some of them say I should run for public office,” he said. “I tell them I will, but I’m afraid someone will make mean cartoons about me.”

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An exhibition in memory of cartoonist Anirban Bora https://robertdejesus.com/an-exhibition-in-memory-of-cartoonist-anirban-bora/ Wed, 04 May 2022 05:20:20 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/an-exhibition-in-memory-of-cartoonist-anirban-bora/ Anirban Bora could never walk past a stationery store without going in to buy art materials. Just as he could not visit a city without exploring its gastronomy. An artist, cartoonist, illustrator and witty observer of ordinary life, Bora died of covid May 1st. He has worked with leading publications such as The Indian Express […]]]>

Anirban Bora could never walk past a stationery store without going in to buy art materials. Just as he could not visit a city without exploring its gastronomy. An artist, cartoonist, illustrator and witty observer of ordinary life, Bora died of covid May 1st. He has worked with leading publications such as The Indian Express and The economic period in Delhi. Its artistic richness is a lasting legacy.

On May 7, the prestigious Indian Institute of Cartoonists in Bengaluru will open an exhibition of Bora’s works, which will be opened by CS Krishna Shetty, former president of Lalit Kala Akademi. the exposure is titled “The World of Anirban Bora”.

Panipuri vendor from Anirban Bora (Express Archives)

“I consider him on the same level as legendary cartoonists such as Miranda and Prabhakar Raobail. Bora had created his unique style and his characters were different from those of other cartoonists. I was a fan of his cartoons, especially the food column called Indica Gastronomica, which once appeared in The Economic Times. Many people like me used to cut this page and keep it,” says VG Narendra, Managing Director, Indian Institute of Designers.

Anirban Bora Mamata of Anirban Bora (Express Archives)

Among the 90 exhibits are 12 cartoons, 10 food-themed works and other cartoons and sketches. The works show Bora’s attention to detail, style and humor. There’s one, in his “Borialis” series, of an unmasked man pedaling happily on a bicycle with coronavirus-shaped wheels. From the same series is an Indian television media commentary covering a crisis – a flood in Kolkata – and another from a crowded bus at rush hour that another passenger wants to board. The city of his birth, Kolkata, figures as a constant muse.

Anirban Bora Gandhi of Anirban Bora (Express Archives)

The Indian Institute of Cartoonists, which has exhibited a number of eminent designers, had been Bora’s choice of the gallery for an exhibition of his works. “We were in regular contact,” explains Narendra. The show is the culmination of this plan.

The exhibition will be held from 7 to 28 May at the Indian Institute of Cartoonists, Bangalore

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Stoke-on-Trent cartoonist Cara wins top prize for her artwork https://robertdejesus.com/stoke-on-trent-cartoonist-cara-wins-top-prize-for-her-artwork/ Mon, 02 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/stoke-on-trent-cartoonist-cara-wins-top-prize-for-her-artwork/ A University of Staffordshire student will have her work on display at a London museum after winning a prestigious prize in the Young Cartoonist of the Year competition. Cara Grainger, in her second year studying cartooning and comics, won the Under 30 award with her article on the importance of art. The 22-year-old, who lives […]]]>

A University of Staffordshire student will have her work on display at a London museum after winning a prestigious prize in the Young Cartoonist of the Year competition. Cara Grainger, in her second year studying cartooning and comics, won the Under 30 award with her article on the importance of art.

The 22-year-old, who lives in Longport, will receive a certificate at an event at the Cartoon Museum in May, alongside an exhibition of artwork by winners and runners-up. More than 150 entries were received for the competition, which is organized by the Cartoon Museum in Fitzrovia, with winners in three age categories decided by a jury of British newspapers and comics.

Previous winners of the competition include Nick Edwards (2009), who won an Emmy for his work on the animated television series Uncle Grandpa, New York cartoonist Will McPhail and political cartoonist Matt Buck. Now in its 26th year, the competition was originally established as the Mel Calman Young Cartoonist Competition, in memory of the Times cartoonist and founder of the Cartoon Arts Trust.

READ: OMD singer defends unsung North Staffordshire artist in new exhibition

Cara first went to college to study criminology, but realized that art was the right path for her. His winning cartoon emphasizes the importance of art and artists for society.

She said: “As far back as I can remember I’ve always drawn, not always cartoons, but ever since I was a kid I knew I wanted to be any artist. When it came to applying in college, I decided not to pursue art anymore and instead went into criminology.



Cara’s winning entry in the Under 30 category of the Young Cartoonist of the Year competition

“After a few years I realized that art wasn’t just a childhood dream – it was what I was made for. I got back into drawing and again applied to college, this time doing what I love.

“While preparing the submission, I knew I wanted to make a statement about the importance of art. I think a lot of people take for granted how important artists are in our society.

“From the clothes we wear to the shows we watch, art is everywhere and without it life would be very boring indeed. I hope I managed to get that point across in my cartoon.”

Cara entered the competition as part of her job for the second year of her undergraduate course and learned she had won while she was home sick with Covid.

She said: “We’ve spent the first term learning about the cartoon industry and all that goes into making a good cartoon. In all honesty, if it wasn’t for all I learned this term, I wouldn’t have entered the contest, let alone Won.

“I was at home with Covid when my friend from the course called to tell me the news. I thought he was joking with me or maybe it was a hallucination that I was sick.

“He had to put my speaker on the phone before I believed him. It caught me so off guard and I was so excited I couldn’t even speak properly after that. I just started dancing around the house .The title alone is more than I ever dreamed of.”

She is now concentrating on her lessons and preparing to sell her work at MCM London Comic Con in late May, as part of an artist group called Gegonos Comics.

Gareth Cowlin, Lecturer in Cartooning and Comics at the University of Staffordshire, said: “All staff and students in the Cartooning and Comics Diploma are incredibly proud of Cara. Like many of the best cartoons, Cara’s idea is deceptively simple, but its execution is the result of many hours of hard work, where she came up with several different ideas and refined the strongest one into her winning form.

“In fact, some recognition should also go to the entire cartoon and comic sophomore year, who rose to the challenge of ‘finding the funny’ in these difficult times with the requisite flair and enthusiasm. “

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Footrot Flats mural painted after the request of the family of the late cartoonist Murray Ball https://robertdejesus.com/footrot-flats-mural-painted-after-the-request-of-the-family-of-the-late-cartoonist-murray-ball/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 22:03:24 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/footrot-flats-mural-painted-after-the-request-of-the-family-of-the-late-cartoonist-murray-ball/ A month later, when the Ball family became aware of the mural, they contacted the council saying that permission had not been given for Russell to proceed with his design. Alterations were made to the mural, but Gareth Ball reiterated to council that the family were unhappy with the mural and wanted it removed. “Never […]]]>

A month later, when the Ball family became aware of the mural, they contacted the council saying that permission had not been given for Russell to proceed with his design.

Alterations were made to the mural, but Gareth Ball reiterated to council that the family were unhappy with the mural and wanted it removed.

“Never mind that he made changes. We still don’t like him and don’t want him there… The fact that Mr Russell ignored our views and went after this is completely unacceptable.”

Gareth Ball demanded an explanation from Russell, who he said had avoided contact, and the council.

The Council’s community chief executive, Lyn Daly, responded with an apology, saying Russell told festival organizers he had the family’s permission, which he did not.

“We will get in touch at some point and want to make sure he learns the seriousness of the misrepresentation and lack of consent as a result of this experience.”

She suggested that other changes could be made to the mural or that it could be painted. Gareth Ball asked for the latter. This happened the next day, March 19.

A letter to Russell from the board on March 22 said it was withholding 75% of his $5,000 fee.

The letter said the street art festival task force had seen correspondence between Russell and the Ball family, including where he said he would not go ahead with the work.

“So we were somewhat surprised to find that even though you had told the Ball family that, you still went ahead and painted the mural.

“While acknowledging the immense talent you possess, it is unfortunate that the task force had no choice but to cover your work to appease the Ball family’s claim.”

Also on March 22, the council issued a press release stating that the mural had been removed.

“The festival organizers were under the impression that the correct permissions had been obtained, but that was not the case and the mural was therefore in violation of copyright,” he said.

The statement said the festival, where other murals were also unveiled, received $26,000 from Creative New Zealand and $10,000 from the council.

The following day, Daly told RNZ’s Checkpoint that the mural had been painted because the copyright owner, the Ball family, had not given permission.

“Certainly, as organizers, we should have asked for a written and signed authorization before giving the green light to the artist.”

Daly told RNZ this week that Russell had “verbally confirmed” he had clearance from the Ball family for the design before signing and returning his contract.

The artists for the festival were selected by the working group, which included representatives from the council and the arts society.

Gareth Ball said his family discovered the mural when a message appeared on a Footrot Flats fan webpage.

“We were very surprised and I immediately tried to contact Ephraim. There was no response,” he said.

“As a young artist, he may have just been unaware of the protocols surrounding the use of other artists’ intellectual property. [intellectual property] and the last thing we would want is for him to be discouraged or otherwise impacted by this event.”

Gareth Ball said the family were regularly approached by people who had ideas about the use of Murray Ball’s work.

“The first and only thing we consider is, ‘What would Murray say?’

“If we were to approve such a project, we would insist on an agreement that would prevent the work from being used in any other way. It would be easy for an artist to claim ownership of their work and seek to reproduce it, or to capitalize on without such a contract in place.”

The council apologized and the Ball family had a good relationship with him.

Gareth Ball said he spoke to Manawatū District Mayor Helen Worboys and would be delighted to see his father’s work continue to be celebrated in Feilding.

Two years ago, a small street bears his name; Feilding had used Footrot Flats as the theme for his annual farm day; and a Welcome to Feilding sign showed Dog resting on the back of a sheep.

The mural was on a wall in Eyre Street in central Feilding.

RNZ

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Lalo Alcaraz, first Latin cartoonist to receive the Herblock Prize https://robertdejesus.com/lalo-alcaraz-first-latin-cartoonist-to-receive-the-herblock-prize/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 22:31:15 +0000 https://robertdejesus.com/lalo-alcaraz-first-latin-cartoonist-to-receive-the-herblock-prize/ Lalo Alcaraz was 13 when his father, a landscaper and nurseryman in the San Diego area, was killed in a car accident in Tijuana. The child of non-English-speaking immigrants, the young Lalo was quick to call his father’s clients to warn them. Instead of expressing sympathy, however, a customer coldly asked her for the phone […]]]>

Lalo Alcaraz was 13 when his father, a landscaper and nurseryman in the San Diego area, was killed in a car accident in Tijuana. The child of non-English-speaking immigrants, the young Lalo was quick to call his father’s clients to warn them. Instead of expressing sympathy, however, a customer coldly asked her for the phone number of a replacement gardener.

Stunned, Alcaraz shouted, “It’s my father!” before hanging up the phone angrily. The sting of the trade was formative – a pain that would affect his career path.

“It made me a good edgy political cartoonist,” Alcaraz says by phone now, speaking from the Los Angeles area. “This is what I draw: my father was treated like a mere machine, not even like a human.”

The powerful and often official forces of inhumanity are often exposed and ridiculed in the art of Alcaraz, 58, who is the first Latino cartoonist to receive the Herblock Prize. The honor, presented by the Herb Block Foundation, salutes work that reflects the spirit of the legendary Washington Post cartoonist.

Alcaraz, a two-time Pulitzer finalist, says his artistic role is to fight misinformation in these times of polarization: “That’s what we do as cartoonists, cut through the [bull] and expose it.

His winning portfolio from last year satirizes burning issues such as abuses on the US-Mexico border, the attempted January 6 insurrection, the banning of school books and the rights of agricultural workers. He’s also tackled pandemic health measures — creating cartoons that directly engage Latino readers about vaccine hesitancy and working with entities like CovidLatino.org and the California Department of Public Health.

“No other political cartoonist working in the United States brings such passion, dedication and brilliance to the fight for fair immigration at the border and justice for the Latino community,” the Herblock award judges said at about Alcaraz’s distinctive perch in political journalism.

Cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz, originally from San Diego, is the creator and author of “La Cucaracha”, the first politically-themed daily Latin comic strip distributed nationally.

(Howard Lipin/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

Jurors made special mention of Alcaraz’s tribute to ‘Tierra o Muerte (Earth or Die)’, artist Emanuel Martínez’s 1967 work depicting Mexican revolutionary Emiliano Zapata who became iconic during the movement Chicano. They appreciated how Alcaraz replaced Zapata’s rifle with a vaccine needle and titled the image “Vacuna o Muerte” – to create “a work that draws inspiration from the past in order to fight the current pandemic”. (His illustrations often nod to artistic traditions, including woodcuts and Mexican muralism.)

“Sometimes I’ll try to make an image that can transcend the moment,” Alcaraz says, noting that if this cartoon’s vaccine awareness “just reached the 70-year-old Chicanos of that era, that would be great” — enough to deserve its doing it.

In one work, he drew a rope-wielding US Border Patrol member on horseback in the style of an antique engraving – visually evoking last year’s viral photo of an officer trying to arrest a Haitian migrant in the Texas. In another, he depicted migrant children confined to cages during the Trump and Biden administrations, with the sign changed from “cage children” to “migrant child facility.” (“Everyone deserves to be screened” under this “hodgepodge immigration policy,” he explains.)

Alcaraz’s border cartoons often spark controversy, as does a black-and-white artwork that compared women’s rights under the Taliban to women’s reproductive rights in Texas. Asked about these works, he said: “You make me understand: all my cartoons have a lot of backlash.

Alcaraz grew accustomed to such backlash early on, often when he satirized what he saw around him in and around San Diego.

His parents met in an adult ESL class at Helix High in East County – his alma mater – and at San Diego State University he became the cartoonist daily newspaper of the main student newspaper. He derided cultural issues as well as aspects of the campus Greek system, until he said his nickname in the mid-1980s newspaper phone list was “Please forward my hate mail”. He says that as a Chicano artist, he drew strength from the MEChA student organization and supported the work efforts of Cesar Chavez.

Alcaraz’s political growth continued while earning his graduate degree in architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. He then moved to the Los Angeles area – where he and his schoolteacher wife raised three children – and pursued entertainment in various forms, including storylines and comedy sketch troupes. He is a writer and consulting producer for the animated series “The Casagrandes” and served as a cultural consultant on Pixar’s “Coco.”

Alcaraz divides his time between Hollywood projects — his comic book “La Cucaracha” is in development as an animated series — and cartoons for outlets such as Andrews McMeel Syndication, Daily Kos and Pocho.com.

The former LA Weekly contributor laments the lack of diversity among American newspaper staff political cartoonists. There are relatively few prominent artists of Latino descent doing editorial cartoons, he says: “We’re too spicy for mainstream newspapers, I guess.” Yet he instead embraces the freedom to be political in his comic: “If I had a personal job, ‘La Cucaracha’ would be more about burrito jokes than war crimes in Ukraine.”

And pressing on multiple fronts, Alcaraz — a virtual artist-in-residence at Arizona State University — aims to inspire the next generation of increasingly diverse creators.

“They don’t have to be a starving artist, and I hope society catches up to that idea,” says Alcaraz, who also illustrated the “Latino USA” book. “I would be happy if they all became screenwriters or wrote graphic novels.

“You can be true to your culture – and you don’t have to water it down for anyone.”

Copyright: (c) 2022, The Washington Post

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